TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


#1508230
I have a Tarpon 120 that is about 4 years old. I only have a few complaints that WS has improved upon for the newer models. Other than a few scratches, and some rigging, my T120 is pretty close to how it was when it was new. I started daydreaming about getting a new kayak, but realized that nothing is wrong with current one.

Question: How many years do you expect out of your kayak and why?

I know it depends on model and usage, but I am curious how long people make their yaks last.
#1508235
It will last about as long as a plastic 5-gallon bucket of the same color. If you bury it in a landfill, it will last forever. It you leave it sitting out in the sun it will start getting brittle in a few years.

That having been said, with normal usage, with not picking up the bow and dragging the kayak over hard surfaces, with taking care around oyster reefs, with tying down the kayak adequately when transporting it, with storing it in the shade, it should be about as good as new in 10 years. I have a 20 year old kayak that is about as good as new.

Lollipop
#1508243
Lollipop wrote:It will last about as long as a plastic 5-gallon bucket of the same color. If you bury it in a landfill, it will last forever. It you leave it sitting out in the sun it will start getting brittle in a few years.

That having been said, with normal usage, with not picking up the bow and dragging the kayak over hard surfaces, with taking care around oyster reefs, with tying down the kayak adequately when transporting it, with storing it in the shade, it should be about as good as new in 10 years. I have a 20 year old kayak that is about as good as new.

Lollipop


20 years?!!! :clap:

I don't think I can make it that long without money burning a hole in my pocket, haha. I do want to make mine last a few more years though. I store mine in a garage, and I don't drag it around too much.

When you say tying down adequately, what exactly do you mean? I use yakima saddles w/ bow/stern tie downs. I often wonder if I am putting too much pressure on the straps.
#1508251
152 Sumo wrote:
When you say tying down adequately, what exactly do you mean? I use yakima saddles w/ bow/stern tie downs. I often wonder if I am putting too much pressure on the straps.


The biggest tying down problems usually occur when carrying kayaks in the bed of a pickup. I've seen a number of puny strings tying kayaks in.

There is an individual, who will remain nameless, but was, and maybe still is, a representative for one of the major kayak manufacturers who was carrying a kayak in the back of his pickup. It flew out, hit the highway and bounced over the car behind him. If it had gotten run over, it would have had more than an asphalt rash.

On a rack, put two straps over the kayak and tie the bow and stern to the front and rear bumpers. You do not have to tie tight. Just snug. While driving, watch for movement of the kayak. If it moves, check your ties to see what the problem is.

Lollipop
#1508268
The old red plastic Coleman 17 foot canoe I had back when dinosaurs roamed, sat in the Texas sun for over 25 years with no care at all. Was treated like a junk yard dog all the time. When I sold it finally it was still going strong and not even faded that I could tell.
#1508333
texnomad wrote:The old red plastic Coleman 17 foot canoe I had back when dinosaurs roamed, sat in the Texas sun for over 25 years with no care at all. Was treated like a junk yard dog all the time. When I sold it finally it was still going strong and not even faded that I could tell.



:lol: In the same boat there. My red Coleman's journey started in Montana no telling what year, and through many years and travels ended up here where I bought it eleven years ago. I put more miles on it that my truck, well maybe not that many, but was always outside and used heavily. I used it last week with the family. The only problem is the color now, it was a vibrant red. I was at H.E.B with it on top of the truck and a lady said, "wow, I love that pink canoe, where did you get it?" :( Caught by surprise, my quick wits were eluding me and I told her, "It's my wife's."
#1508380
not real sure how old my buddies yak is but he bought it brand new when they first started production of it and has abused the crap out of it. down white water over rocks across streets and over oysters. to this day he still perfers it over anything else. the yak is very solid and stable with a butt load of scratches on bottom and not a single leak in it.
Last edited by Old Skool Hookers on Tue Jul 27, 2010 12:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#1508384
This post has made me aware that I probably need to start treating my Ocean Big Game a little better. I have scraped way too many oysters and dragged it probably more than I should. :? :? Been thinking of selling it to try out something new. Thinking of maybe the Ultimate
#1508387
I hope I don't hi-jack the thread, but I do have a small ? I have my OK Trident 13 and i lay it flat in the bed of my truck and then use a ratchet strap and go through the side handles and strap it to either side of the bed. I don't do it tight enough to break the handles, but I was wondering on opinions of how I could do it better in terms of making the yak last! I don't want to spend the money on a big thule rack that costs way too much money and I can't have anything permanent because I carry my four wheeler in the bed of my truck alot suring duck season. I don't really see how a truck extender is much different than what I'm doing now, and I don't know of any other way to do it! If anybody wants to throw their two cents at me please do!
#1508395
Mini-x-man wrote:I hope I don't hi-jack the thread, but I do have a small ? I have my OK Trident 13 and i lay it flat in the bed of my truck and then use a ratchet strap and go through the side handles and strap it to either side of the bed. I don't do it tight enough to break the handles, but I was wondering on opinions of how I could do it better in terms of making the yak last! I don't want to spend the money on a big thule rack that costs way too much money and I can't have anything permanent because I carry my four wheeler in the bed of my truck alot suring duck season. I don't really see how a truck extender is much different than what I'm doing now, and I don't know of any other way to do it! If anybody wants to throw their two cents at me please do!


I tried a bed extender and really didn't like it. It might have been due to my needing new shocks for my truck :lol: but when driving with my kayak on it my kayak bounced too much. What I do now and prefer is to put my kayak in the back of my truck flat on the bed then I put a strap across the top in front of where the tailgate ends then hook the straps to my hitch where you would hook the trailer safety chains. Then just tighten til snug. I use the kayaks football shape to restrain it from moving back. Basically since the kayak gets larger in diameter towards the middle the kayak can't move further out because of this. Then I add another strap at the front of the kayak where it hits my bed and put that strap thru the handle and tighten it til snug. Drives alot better this way and the kayak doesn't bounce as much as it did when I had the extender. Since I basically only drive max 1 hr with my kayak in the back of my truck I don't think there is any danger of deforming the kayak. I could be wrong and if I was really worried about it then I could always just get the jumbo pool noodle and place my kayak on top of it. One towards teh front of the yak and one towards the back.
#1509012
A kayak, or anything for that matter, will last an infinate number of years. You can't put a general number on it because there is no expiration date. It's a matter of how well the owner takes care of the kayak. You're not dealing with motors or anything so as far as moving parts and transmissions going out you're in the clear. Three main rules of kayak care are....keep your kayak out of the sun(when not in use), wash/rinse off after use, never drag your kayak. I have friends who leave their yaks outside and wonder why it looks like s**t. Water, especially salt water, can also break down your kayak over time. And of course dragging is a big nono if you care at all about your kayak lasting a long time.

There are plenty of people who look to buy used kayaks, especially in great condition. Don't be afraid to upgrade and change kayaks because that's all part of the fun. Just put that money into your new one. It's always cool to have new gadgets and toys to play with. My first kayak is in such great condition that I just kept it so that I can take buddys out on that don't have a kayak.
#1509165
surfdude wrote:A kayak, or anything for that matter, will last an infinate number of years. You can't put a general number on it because there is no expiration date. It's a matter of how well the owner takes care of the kayak. You're not dealing with motors or anything so as far as moving parts and transmissions going out you're in the clear. Three main rules of kayak care are....keep your kayak out of the sun(when not in use), wash/rinse off after use, never drag your kayak. I have friends who leave their yaks outside and wonder why it looks like s**t. Water, especially salt water, can also break down your kayak over time. And of course dragging is a big nono if you care at all about your kayak lasting a long time.

There are plenty of people who look to buy used kayaks, especially in great condition. Don't be afraid to upgrade and change kayaks because that's all part of the fun. Just put that money into your new one. It's always cool to have new gadgets and toys to play with. My first kayak is in such great condition that I just kept it so that I can take buddys out on that don't have a kayak.


You might have missed the point of my original post. I know that the life of the kayak depends on usage, sun exposure, dragging, etc. I just wanted to know what others expect: a couple years, ten years, or new one every time the newer models come out.

Not trying to be rude, by the way. All of what you posted makes sense, it's just not what I wanted to know.
#1509219
I expect mine to last 20 plus years and then some. Not sure I follow your question. Kayaks will change/improve as technology improves. It's all personal preference on what you want as far as storage, propell devices, and overall functionality of the kayak. Unless the kayak has a whole or is damaged, a kayak will have a use by someone, somewhere. One man's trash is another man's treasure.

Now if your question is about when others usually decide to upgrade.......then my answer to that is when I see something else that my current kayak can't provide. I have my sights set on the Hobie Pro Angler due to the overall functionality and comfort. My other yaks don't even compare as far as storage and space. But that doesn't mean that the other kayaks are useless.

I think the question may have been misunderstood.
#1509320
How many years do you expect out of your kayak and why?

I know that two identical kayaks could have completely different amounts of time that they last based on storage, use, personal preference, owner's ability to repair, etc. The list can go on and on.

I don't want to know what exactly makes a kayak last longer (common sense), I want to know how long the average person makes it last before replacing it. Probably a tough thing to ask, since there are going to be extremes. One guy will baby his yak and make it last for 10 or 15 years. Another guy might look at it as an annual expense, abuse the crap out of it, and buy another the next year. There are too many variables for one answer. I am just curious what others are doing.
#1509349
152 Sumo wrote:How many years do you expect out of your kayak and why?

I don't want to know what exactly makes a kayak last longer (common sense), I want to know how long the average person makes it last before replacing it.

I am just curious what others are doing.


You will find that 97% or more of the posters have an agenda (but deny it) and interpret questions to suit that agenda, no matter what you ask. If you ask what variety of pickup they drive, someone will post about the kayak they paddle and how it is too long for their pickup bed.

To show I am part of that 97%, I will now deny that I have an agenda.

Lollipop
#1509368
I now regret starting this thread. :lol:

I guess there are too many variables. Some yakers are thrifty, some have money to spend. Some fish little ponds with muddy bottoms, some fish and drag over oyster beds. Some pick up, some drag. Some toss it in the back yard to sit in the sun, some rinse off after every trip and store in garage. Some like keeping things simple, some are gear freaks that have to have the latest and greatest. Add multiple combinations of the above and you have no answer the same.

I guess I am just going to have to find the balance between making mine last and saving money for the next one.

:horse:
#1509375
Didn't mean to be difficult....Do your research and find out what yak fits you and your style of fishing.....having owned and used a kayak for a while will give you a better idea of what you would like different in your next kayak. I think that's the best part about owning a kayak.....the ease of upgrading. It won't be hard to sell once you do decide to upgrade (which of course the amount you sell it for largly depends on how well you take care of it). You can buy a kayak for $2,000, use it for 2 years, turn around and sell it for $1,600. Try doing that with a boat and your out thousands. If your happy with your current kayak then stay with it. Enjoy the ride my friend. :dance:
#1509390
You weren't being difficult. :)

My comment about regretting this thread is that I should have realized that I am going to get a thousand different ideas on how long a kayak will last, how to make it last longer, etc.

I have had my kayak for about 4 years, and it still performs just as good as day 1. It was when I saw what the newer models had that got the gears turning for a new one. The grass is always greener............

I am just going to add a couple flush mount rod holders so I can get rid of the milk crate and free up tankwell for storage, take care of the hull the best I can, and buy a new one when my budget can afford it (which isn't right now)
#1509425
I own a 1998 Wilderness System Ride that I bought used in 2002. The guy before me stored it in an open shed. I store it between my fence and side house. Use it at least one weekend a month for fishing and have paddled in 2 kayak marathon races with it. In marathons and training alone I've totaled over 250 miles of paddling along with salt water fishing at least once a month. Its beat up to hell with scratches all over it but it still floats and I have never had any problems with it especially considering its been stored outside and is now 12 years old.
#1509439
Phatwater wrote:I own a 1998 Wilderness System Ride that I bought used in 2002. The guy before me stored it in an open shed. I store it between my fence and side house. Use it at least one weekend a month for fishing and have paddled in 2 kayak marathon races with it. In marathons and training alone I've totaled over 250 miles of paddling along with salt water fishing at least once a month. Its beat up to hell with scratches all over it but it still floats and I have never had any problems with it especially considering its been stored outside and is now 12 years old.


haha.. and here I am worrying about "needing" another kayak in a year or two. Mine is stored in the garage and I am lucky if I get out once every other month. In fact, since I moved to TX in November 08, I think my kayak has touched water only 5 or 6 times.

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