TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


By skvac
#1456345
Went out for the first time on Lake Waco Sunday and (didn't turtle) :D . It really was alot fun and work, but still fun. I noticed the back sat a little too low in the water. Can I add more buoyancy to the back? What should I use? Any info would be great.
P.S.Where do I get a TKF stricker for my yak?
By texnomad
#1456354
Generally moving weight forward is a better choice. It will be hard to get more buoyancy down in the water without destroying your flowline. That can make paddling more "barge like". If the add on is not nearly perfectly symmetrical it will cause the boat to tend to steer one direction or another.
#1456365
texnomad wrote:Generally moving weight forward is a better choice. It will be hard to get more buoyancy down in the water without destroying your flowline. That can make paddling more "barge like". If the add on is not nearly perfectly symmetrical it will cause the boat to tend to steer one direction or another.


...and don't fall into the belief that you gain buoyancy by adding air bags to the inside of your kayak. Anything you add to the inside of the kayak is taking up the same volume as the air that is all ready there. :wink:
By Lollipop
#1456456
skvac wrote: What happeneds when I paddle is some water comes over the rear, the limit is 350 lbs and I'm 270 lbs.


There are no industry standards for calculating the weight limits for a kayak. For running the Rio Grande in Big Bend, the park personnel will take the MFG weight rating for inflatable kayaks and cut it in half.

I suspect you are already very close to being overloaded. Most kayak weight limits include the weight of the kayak, the weight of the gear and the weight of the metabolic motor (you). So you have 80 pounds for the weight of the kayak and the gear.

If you tend to lean back in the kayak, that transfers weight to the rear. I prefer to sit up straight or lean forward. That transfers the weight forward and keeps the bow down in the water so the wind does not catch it and the kayak tracks better.


Lollipop
#1456465
skvac wrote:Thanks for the input! So styrofoam wouldn't work? What happeneds when I paddle is some water comes over the rear, the limit is 350 lbs and I'm 270 lbs.


...and with you being 270, you're a large fellow. Others have posted up about size, weight, and which kayak serves them best. I am 285 and I found the industry's best offers for me were the Malibu X-Factor (loved it for the weight it could handle and the gear I could stow on it), the Wilderness System T160 (love it for the speed and with a rudder it is my boat of choice for flats), and the Ocean Kayak Big Game Prowler (good boat but not my choice).

In the end, the choice is yours but sometimes its good to hear others with similar concerns/frustrations. I tried using an X-13. At my size it wasn't doable at all. There are plenty of kayaks out there to play with and try out so don't feel like you have to settle for what you have if it is not giving you the best experience possible. As for the TKF sticker, there is a TKF store link somewhere in the home page of the TKF website.
User avatar
By Flatfish
#1456470
Try putting a gallon or two of drinking water in the bow hatch, we always did that and we don't weigh much. It's just physics, no matter what you weigh all of the weight is in the back, a gallon or two of water up front will make you plane out better.
User avatar
By Mythman
#1456494
As said above, with the max capacity at 350 lbs and you at 275 lbs, I would tend to think you are overloaded now. If at capacity, the kayak probably isn't very efficient paddling.

I wouldn't advise adding any additional weight.

I would try a few kayaks that have 5-600 lb capacities and see it they handled better.

Good luck!
User avatar
By RPB
#1456641
skvac wrote:Thanks for the input! So styrofoam wouldn't work? What happeneds when I paddle is some water comes over the rear, the limit is 350 lbs and I'm 270 lbs.


Styrofoam weighs "something" (more than the air currently inside the hull.)
Adding more weight to the back of your kayak inside will make the back sit lower in the water, not higher.


Removing all the air in your hull and replacing it with Helium balloons(which is lighter than air) might work (just kidding)

As others said, move weight forward or get a higher capacity rated kayak..
#1456883
AyJay wrote:Or sign up for weight watchers and hit the treadmill. Not a joke or a criticism, but if you lose some weight yourself if you can, that'll help too.



I agree--I'm working on it myself, too...
#1459540
the question reminds me of the first time I ever really looked for a kayak. I was looking at bass pro and the "helpful" employee explained to me that even though the yak was rated at 350lbs capacity, if I put foam or floats in it 450 lbs would be no problem... I resolved to only buy used or from "professional shops" from then on...

... but back to you question: Can the buoyancy be changed (increased)... the answer is yes and no... for our purposes, buoyancy is tied to hull volume. Since you can't really increase the volume of your hull, you would have to add more hulls. the easy way to do that is add alma's (outriggers). Commercial ones are available and I have seen what some guys have made from foam and glass (REALLY GOOD RESULTS IF YOU WORK CAREFULLY).. not cheap but cheaper than a new boat and would add stability (and of course drag) ..

Re-arranging weight distribution can help if you are just low at the stern but high at the bow.. then you may need to just move gear to the front...
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