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By Hunter25
#2312992
Just got a kayak and am ready to join the ranks. I understand that wearing waders may not be the most safe thing to do but how do you dress warm when it's 40 degrees outside. I can't wait until spring.
#2312999
Hunter25 wrote:Just got a kayak and am ready to join the ranks. I understand that wearing waders may not be the most safe thing to do but how do you dress warm when it's 40 degrees outside. I can't wait until spring.
I hear ya, can't wait to shed the wind breaker!

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By Neumie
#2313018
This is my default response and is what I wore when I lived in DFW for several years. I was good for kayaking and wade fishing in mid 20's air temp. For the coast it's a bit overkill most days, that's why it's important to layer.

Here's my typical winter clothing response:

First and foremost try to avoid any wearing cotton if at all possible. It's a poor insulator, holds moisture against your body, and takes a long time to dry; all bad things in the winter. Wool is excellent at insulating (even when wet) and wicking moisture away from your body. It is a bit expensive, but luckily polyester based synthetic fibers (think fleece) can replicate the properties of wool at a much more affordable price.

I start with knee high silk weight liner socks along with silk weight boxer briefs and under shirt. Then it's a lightweight baselayer pant and long sleeve shirt followed by knee high wool socks over the pant. The next layer consists of a fleece 1/4 zip sweatshirt and fleece wader pants. Then I'll add one more layer of pants which are kind of like your standard fishing pants but made with slightly thicker material and windproof. Everything I wear is designed to pull moisture away from my body. You'll also notice that I wear multiple layers which allows me to remove layers as the outside temperature or my body's temperature rises through the day. While on the water I wear breathable, stockingfoot waders, wading boots, and a lightweight, breathable, wind/water proof rain jacket. This may sound cumbersome and bulky, but I don't feel restricted at all. A fleece/wool beanie, glomitts (fingerless gloves that have the mitten cover flap), and a buff finish off my winter garb. Nearly all of my baselayer clothing is Cabelas branded, and has held up well for many years.


Cliff notes version:
1st layer: Silk weight sock liner, boxer briefs, and under shirt
2nd layer: Thick wool socks, lightweight baselayer pant and long sleeve shirt
3rd layer: Performance Fleece wader pant and 1/4 zip pull over
4th layer: Windproof pant and wind/water proof jacket
5th layer: Breathable stockingfoot waders, wading boots, Buff, fleece/wool beanie, and glomitts.

Wearing a PFD is probably more important during the winter than summer. You're going to be wearing more clothing which makes it more difficult to swim and you also don't know how your body is going to react with the shock of entering cold water. You could easily become disorientated or the shock of the cold water could cause you to instantly inhale while under water.

Waders are OK to wear during the winter. If properly worn with a belt they are hard to fill up. If they do fill up with water they don't weigh you down like most people think, however they could make it more difficult to swim or get back into your kayak so you may have to ditch the waders to increase your mobility.
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By Neumie
#2313019
What I would wear on a typical winter trip in Corpus would be
1st layer: Silk weight sock liner, boxer briefs, and under shirt
2nd layer: Med-Thick wool socks and typical long sleeve fishing shirt
3rd layer: Performance Fleece wader pant and 1/4 zip pull over
4th layer: Breathable stockingfoot waders, water/wind proof jacket, wading boots, Buff, fleece/wool beanie, and glomitts.
#2313020
Neumie wrote:This is my default response and is what I wore when I lived in DFW for several years. I was good for kayaking and wade fishing in mid 20's air temp. For the coast it's a bit overkill most days, that's why it's important to layer.

Here's my typical winter clothing response:

First and foremost try to avoid any wearing cotton if at all possible. It's a poor insulator, holds moisture against your body, and takes a long time to dry; all bad things in the winter. Wool is excellent at insulating (even when wet) and wicking moisture away from your body. It is a bit expensive, but luckily polyester based synthetic fibers (think fleece) can replicate the properties of wool at a much more affordable price.

I start with knee high silk weight liner socks along with silk weight boxer briefs and under shirt. Then it's a lightweight baselayer pant and long sleeve shirt followed by knee high wool socks over the pant. The next layer consists of a fleece 1/4 zip sweatshirt and fleece wader pants. Then I'll add one more layer of pants which are kind of like your standard fishing pants but made with slightly thicker material and windproof. Everything I wear is designed to pull moisture away from my body. You'll also notice that I wear multiple layers which allows me to remove layers as the outside temperature or my body's temperature rises through the day. While on the water I wear breathable, stockingfoot waders, wading boots, and a lightweight, breathable, wind/water proof rain jacket. This may sound cumbersome and bulky, but I don't feel restricted at all. A fleece/wool beanie, glomitts (fingerless gloves that have the mitten cover flap), and a buff finish off my winter garb. Nearly all of my baselayer clothing is Cabelas branded, and has held up well for many years.


Cliff notes version:
1st layer: Silk weight sock liner, boxer briefs, and under shirt
2nd layer: Thick wool socks, lightweight baselayer pant and long sleeve shirt
3rd layer: Performance Fleece wader pant and 1/4 zip pull over
4th layer: Windproof pant and wind/water proof jacket
5th layer: Breathable stockingfoot waders, wading boots, Buff, fleece/wool beanie, and glomitts.

Wearing a PFD is probably more important during the winter than summer. You're going to be wearing more clothing which makes it more difficult to swim and you also don't know how your body is going to react with the shock of entering cold water. You could easily become disorientated or the shock of the cold water could cause you to instantly inhale while under water.

Waders are OK to wear during the winter. If properly worn with a belt they are hard to fill up. If they do fill up with water they don't weigh you down like most people think, however they could make it more difficult to swim or get back into your kayak so you may have to ditch the waders to increase your mobility.
Just listen to Josh he knows way more!

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By Neumie
#2313021
2 Weight Willie wrote:
Hunter25 wrote:This was a serious question
O......well try a wind breaker and some cargo pants.(that's what I wear)(that's a serious answer)

You really need to wear a water/wind proof outerwear during the winter. Being wet in the cold is not a good thing.
#2313022
Neumie wrote:What I would wear on a typical winter trip in Corpus would be
1st layer: Silk weight sock liner, boxer briefs, and under shirt
2nd layer: Med-Thick wool socks and typical long sleeve fishing shirt
3rd layer: Performance Fleece wader pant and 1/4 zip pull over
4th layer: Breathable stockingfoot waders, water/wind proof jacket, wading boots, Buff, fleece/wool beanie, and glomitts.
That 3rd and 4th layer is almost exactly what my dad would always wear.

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#2313023
Neumie wrote:
2 Weight Willie wrote:
Hunter25 wrote:This was a serious question
O......well try a wind breaker and some cargo pants.(that's what I wear)(that's a serious answer)

You really need to wear a water/wind proof outerwear during the winter. Being wet in the cold is not a good thing.
I meant in the yak.

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#2313024
Neumie wrote:
2 Weight Willie wrote:
Hunter25 wrote:This was a serious question
O......well try a wind breaker and some cargo pants.(that's what I wear)(that's a serious answer)

You really need to wear a water/wind proof outerwear during the winter. Being wet in the cold is not a good thing.
I wouldn't even be thinking about wading Jan-Feb. Rockport water gets to cold for that Ha!

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#2313025
2 Weight Willie wrote:I meant in the yak.

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So did I.

You wade a little just launching, paddle drips, fish splashing you, and worst case you turtle while out in deeper water. You need to do your best to stay as dry as possible.
#2313026
Neumie wrote:
2 Weight Willie wrote:I meant in the yak.

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So did I.

You wade a little just launching, paddle drips, fish splashing you, and worst case you turtle while out in deeper water. You need to do your best to stay as dry as possible.
Thank you Josh I'm not OP and I learned a lot! Thank you for the advice. That's why I'm on the forum. To learn!

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#2313028
Neumie wrote:
2 Weight Willie wrote:I meant in the yak.

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So did I.

You wade a little just launching, paddle drips, fish splashing you, and worst case you turtle while out in deeper water. You need to do your best to stay as dry as possible.
Ps: try to be patient with me you know my age I presume.

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By karstopo
#2313033
Winter is the BEST time to fish. Less crowds, clear water, concentrated fish, no chance of heat stroke.

My winter tips are as follows: Wait, wait some more, wait a little longer. No sense launching at the crack of dawn if it’s 40 degrees. By noon, it might be 60. Fish often come alive and want to feast in afternoon sun warmed water.
Wear shorts. Seriously, water drip from paddles on pants, even nylon, chills me, water drip on bare skin, not so much. It’s Physics, evaporative cooling, pants greatly expand the surface area for cooling. Wear layers on top, wear a warm hat, wear shorts. Okay, if you are determined to fish in really cloudy and chilly weather, try hydrophobic material pants or breathable waders, definitely not neoprene unless you like stewing in your own juice.
Find a wind break. A levee, a row of houses, a spoil bank, some brush. Wind robs heat.
Turn your body into the sun, be a solar panel, so to speak.
Paddle like holy heck if you get cold, vigorous paddling produces plenty of body heat.
No cotton next to skin.
#2313034
karstopo wrote:Winter is the BEST time to fish. Less crowds, clear water, concentrated fish, no chance of heat stroke.

My winter tips are as follows: Wait, wait some more, wait a little longer. No sense launching at the crack of dawn if it’s 40 degrees. By noon, it might be 60. Fish often come alive and want to feast in afternoon sun warmed water.
Wear shorts. Seriously, water drip from paddles on pants, even nylon, chills me, water drip on bare skin, not so much. It’s Physics, evaporative cooling, pants greatly expand the surface area for cooling. Wear layers on top, wear a warm hat, wear shorts. Okay, if you are determined to fish in really cloudy and chilly weather, try hydrophobic material pants or breathable waders, definitely not neoprene unless you like stewing in your own juice.
Find a wind break. A levee, a row of houses, a spoil bank, some brush. Wind robs heat.
Turn your body into the sun, be a solar panel, so to speak.
Paddle like holy heck if you get cold, vigorous paddling produces plenty of body heat.
No cotton next to skin.
I like the water wicking pants, but that's in the summer and fall.

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By ben_beyer
#2313093
I don't fish too much when it's below 40 degrees mainly because in a kayak you are going to get wet not being able to feel your hands/fingers just isn't fun to me. A lot of this goes back almost 20 years and being on during a severe cold front coming in to Central Texas while scouting wheat for pests.

When I go out in sub-60 temperatures, I wear my same quick drying nylon pants (Magellan Laguna Madre) and moisture wicking or button up fishing shirt. I then put my rain suit over that. It's a nice one that is washable that I bought from Bass Pro Shops about 20 years ago. It cost around $100 and I used to keep it in my tackle bag when I would boat fish growing up.

Depending on where I'm going and the weather forecast, I'll either wear regular shoes or something that will keep my feet from being wet. I've worn rubber boots in the past but that material is maybe not the best. I have some snake boots now for work that I plan to try just because they seem to be insulated a little better. The whole goal for me is keeping my feet dry and warm.

I plan on getting some waders in the near future but it would be more for wade fishing whereas if I'm in the kayak, I probably won't get into the water.

One good tip from Captain Scott Null (let's go on here) on the Bite Me podcast was to keep a dry bag with a spare change of clothes in your kayak.
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By Ron Mc
#2313094
I neither bicycle nor even fish the Guadalupe tailrace below 40 degrees.

The dreary days I've fished the coast in the mid 40s, it was find a hole and catch using shrimp on the bottom.

But don't let this weather put you off fishing until next May. There will be some great days before then.
Have even been out in mid-50s fog where we paddled over redfish hunkered down in the grass and apparently napping, though we found trout in the passes eating glass minnows.
Just plan smart - pick those mid 50s mornings with afternoon tide movement and sun.

Image
ok, this day began in the mid-40s, but you see it warmed up
Image
Image
Last edited by Ron Mc on Mon Dec 07, 2020 5:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#2313097
Ron Mc wrote:I neither bicycle nor even fish the Guadalupe tailrace below 40 degrees.

The dreary days I've fished the coast in the mid 40s, it was find a hole and catch using shrimp on the bottom.

But don't let this weather put you off fishing until next May. There will be some great days before then.
Have even been out in mid-50s fog where we paddled over redfish hunkered down in the grass and apparently napping, though we found trout in the passes eating glass minnows.
Just plan smart. Pick those mid 50s days with afternoon tide movement and sun.

Image
ok, this day began in the mid-40s, but you see it warmed up
Image
Image
Where are you at in that middle pic.?

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By Ron Mc
#2313099
East Flats Lake - last time we were there was Oct 5, and the lake was a bust on a sharply falling tide, though the deeper flat was hot.
Duplicating this tide on a winter day would probably also find more big trout.
Image
The lake is a place to go on sun and rising tide in the winter.

Image
Image

I'll also add I'm wearing some spendy gear on my cold kayak fishing days - Kokatat dry pants.
They're a bit like waders and also very unlike them.
They wear like clothes, very comfortable sitting, easy to get on and off in a kayak - the built-in socks are goretex rather than neoprene.
They have neoprene cuffs and waistband (no suspenders needed).
I also have stocking-foot waders, but don't like them in the kayak. They're built heavier, baggier, need suspenders, and I use them for winter wading the Guadalupe tailwater.
Image
#2313104
Ron Mc wrote:East Flats Lake - last time we were there was Oct 5, and the lake was a bust on a sharply falling tide, though the deeper flat was hot.
Duplicating this tide on a winter day would probably also find more big trout.
Image
The lake is a place to go on sun and rising tide in the winter.

Image
Image

I'll also add I'm wearing some spendy gear on my cold kayak fishing days - Kokatat dry pants.
They're a bit like waders and also very unlike them.
They wear like clothes, very comfortable sitting, easy to get on and off in a kayak - the built-in socks are goretex rather than neoprene.
They have neoprene cuffs and waistband (no suspenders needed).
I also have stocking-foot waders, but don't like them in the kayak. They're built heavier, baggier, need suspenders, and I use them for winter wading the Guadalupe tailwater.
Image
Beautiful pics! Thanks

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#2313105
2 Weight Willie wrote:
Ron Mc wrote:East Flats Lake - last time we were there was Oct 5, and the lake was a bust on a sharply falling tide, though the deeper flat was hot.
Duplicating this tide on a winter day would probably also find more big trout.
Image
The lake is a place to go on sun and rising tide in the winter.

Image
Image

I'll also add I'm wearing some spendy gear on my cold kayak fishing days - Kokatat dry pants.
They're a bit like waders and also very unlike them.
They wear like clothes, very comfortable sitting, easy to get on and off in a kayak - the built-in socks are goretex rather than neoprene.
They have neoprene cuffs and waistband (no suspenders needed).
I also have stocking-foot waders, but don't like them in the kayak. They're built heavier, baggier, need suspenders, and I use them for winter wading the Guadalupe tailwater.
Image
Beautiful pics! Thanks

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What compass in on your yak?

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