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By Bowhunter8213
#2304901
Good Afternoon TKF! I’m brand new to this forum and brand new to the kayak world. I’ve been a long time fisherman, but brand new to kayak fishing. I mainly fish East Matagorda Bay from the beach side at different access points. I’m hoping to learn tips, tricks and do’s/don’ts from everyone’s experiences. I’ve always wanted a kayak and my wife made me happy in Father’s Day and bought me one! Incredibly ecstatic about it! Hope everyone is having a great Sunday!

Chris


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By Tombo
#2304942
Keep it simple and try not to bring too much stuff. When I fish new places I just keep paddling until something peaks my interest like a blow up or bait fleeing out of the water.
User avatar
By Ron Mc
#2304944
Welcome to the forum and post some reports for us.
I'll add to Tom's great point, begin that paddle generally upwind, so generally downwind is home.

Here's my buddy Lou bringing a sight-fished trout from the grass at Trout Bayou, calm Aransas Bay in the distance -
Tom's somewhere behind me, catching reds by fish sign on Talley shore.
Image
Last edited by Ron Mc on Mon Jun 29, 2020 9:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By shoffer
#2304952
Other than the many friends I have made from here, in my view, the most valuable advice on here is rigging ideas. I have tried a bunch and they are really helpful. I got into Kayak Fishing in 2009. Since then, and from this board (and other Youtube videos) I have (a) built a Hobie Trolling Motor Setup; (b) built my double crate; (c) purchased and modified a double trailer for the yaks, complete with storage; (d) learned about the safety issues we all need to remember, the solunar table, how to really target flounder and not catch them by accident; (e) fish BTB and learn how to make the tackle for the outing; (f) learn how to attach padeyes to my kayak with pop rivets; (g) determine the right equipment; and (h) a mountain of other things.

You will enjoy it. Welcome.
User avatar
By JW FunGuy
#2304958
Hi Chris! Welcome to the club!

I’ve been a long time fisherman, fly mostly, I didn’t dig my casting rods out until I started fishing the salt. I have been kayaking almost as long as I have been fly fishing, whitewater mostly then kayak touring when I moved from the mountains. I hadn’t put the two together until a couple of years ago when I tried this at the coast. Thing is I still love to paddle, I love to explore new channels, marshes etc. I love to see the various birds, wildlife, dolphins, all that the coast has to offer. And yes I love to catch fish and bring some home to eat. Some people think I’m weird when I say for me it is probably 80% the kayaking and 20% the fishing, I know those numbers change on given trips, too much wind, too much water, not enough water. And those numbers do help when you don’t catch anything! But the point here is, and a big part of this forum, is the kayak. Learn how to use it, how to paddle properly and efficiently, same with turning. Then rig it out in a way that suits your style (there are tons of ideas here). But most of all just go out, enjoy Yourself and be Safe!
Maybe we will run into each other someplace.
By Bowhunter8213
#2304959
shoffer wrote:Other than the many friends I have made from here, in my view, the most valuable advice on here is rigging ideas. I have tried a bunch and they are really helpful. I got into Kayak Fishing in 2009. Since then, and from this board (and other Youtube videos) I have (a) built a Hobie Trolling Motor Setup; (b) built my double crate; (c) purchased and modified a double trailer for the yaks, complete with storage; (d) learned about the safety issues we all need to remember, the solunar table, how to really target flounder and not catch them by accident; (e) fish BTB and learn how to make the tackle for the outing; (f) learn how to attach padeyes to my kayak with pop rivets; (g) determine the right equipment; and (h) a mountain of other things.

You will enjoy it. Welcome.

I’m definitely interested in a trailer of some sort. Right now, I carry the yak’s in the bed of my truck, but I’m a little apprehensive about it.


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User avatar
By shoffer
#2304968
Check out the trailer rigging post here for ideas and inspiration:
viewtopic.php?f=53&t=121567

Here is a picture of mine. It started like this (though I added the two wood slats on the back): A 4x6 Carry-On Trailer purchased from Tractor Supply (with no back gate):

Image

Then I bought the kayak saddles and bars (Black P3000 Universal Pickup 2 72" bar Clamp-On ladder rack system) from Vantec USA - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0085W09NI/re ... 1_ST1_dp_1)

Although I just saw this from Amazon that is cheaper and a complete kit – might work better for you:
Capture.JPG

https://www.amazon.com/AA-Products-Non- ... 047&sr=8-1

Now it now looks like this:

Image
Image
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By Kayak Kid
#2304971
My two cents:

I began paddling wood frame-canvas covered kayaks when I was nine. I guess the joyous feeling of slipping silently through the water with the least amount of effort never left me. Having fully retired in 2003, I replaced my enthusiasm for business with that of kayak fly fishing.

Plastic sit on top kayaks were new to me in 03 so, shopping around for a lightweight, sit on top boat, was no easy chore. I found that the most popular kayaks were much heavier than I was used to, and didn't accelerate through the water as had the kayaks of my youth. The carbon paddles, however, were far superior to the wooden paddles I was used to.

The first SOT I purchased was a Wilderness sixteen footer. I combined that with a Werner carbon twist grip paddle. Although quite heavy, and requiring a rudder for wind travel, it served me well for my first year on the water. This first year of kayak fishing...,along with the following 17 years...,was greatly enhanced due to my membership in P.A.C.K. A great bunch of guys from all walks of life who share a love for kayak fishing, primitive camping, and the camaraderie that accompanies such activities.
An old Eagle Scout's ideal place to be.

During my second year 'on the water' I read about a kayak made by SEDA in San Diago. It was the SEDA Revenge. It featured a well regarded 17 ft. by 25 in. kevlar ocean cruising hull, a comfortable sit on top self draining cockpit, and an overall weight of 40 pounds. Reach forward to engage the water with your paddle blade, initiate a proper return stroke...,the kayak glides forward and your properly stroked paddle blade ends up at the point where your stroke began...,the boat gliding through the water as if it was on ice..

I actually found a used one in a kayak shop in the Woodlands and purchased it on the spot.
This was not a boat for everyone. One rather famous Gulf Coast kayak guide paddled it around for fifteen minutes, came back, and when I asked him what he thought about the boat, he replied, without hesitation, "your crazy!". It was, however, the boat for me. I relished each moment I spent on the water with that kayak. The youngsters couldn't figure out why they couldn't keep with the old man. It was the kayak stupid, and the paddle, and knowing how to paddle effortlessly.

Along with the SEDA, I've owned at various times, about five different kayaks for different reasons. My kayaking days came to an end about a year ago, but I only recently got rid of the SEDA.

My point in sharing this is to pass on that kayak fishing is many things to many different people. Why it is, and what it might become to you, is probably not known at this time. So, rather than see how many gidgets and gadgets you can add onto your boat, perhaps you should first attempt to see how few additions you can add (a rudder is a necessity due to our Coastal winds).

Examples:
Why put on an anchor trolly when there is an easier, more effective way way?

Why put rod holders everywhere when you only need one?

Why purchase a trailor when there are inexpensive gizmos that enable you to safely carry your yak in the bed of your truck?

And why read ads for kayak gizmos when you should be reading about kayak safety, and fishing locations.

Have fun, catch fish, and be safe.
User avatar
By Ron Mc
#2304981
I'm going to be taking exception with KK here (except about Werner paddles).

35-kt gale while being hit by a wall-cloud squall.
Rode it out with drift sock deployed at stern (by trolley) - it was actually fun.
Tough to recognize that this is 2'-deep water.
Image
How are you going to drift fish, conveniently recover your drift sock, paddle up and set up a new drift, repeat, without a trolley (rhetorical question).

One rod holder is great with one fly rod.
Image

3 rod holders are great fishing two rigged 1/4-oz inshore lures, plus an UL for 1/16-oz lures and winter glass minnows.
Image

though I actually saw a guy going out on Boerne City Lake with 7 rigged rods - I guess somewhere you gotta draw the line.
Last edited by Ron Mc on Wed Jul 01, 2020 6:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
By Bowhunter8213
#2304990
imaoldmanyoungsalt wrote:Welcome Chris!
Always remember safety first and have fun. East Matty is a good place to fish. I love it there! So what Yak did you get?

The wife bought us (2) of the Pelican Mustang 120X. All we could afford, but it will get the job done! Really excited about this!


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By Bowhunter8213
#2304991
Kayak Kid wrote:My two cents:

I began paddling wood frame-canvas covered kayaks when I was nine. I guess the joyous feeling of slipping silently through the water with the least amount of effort never left me. Having fully retired in 2003, I replaced my enthusiasm for business with that of kayak fly fishing.

Plastic sit on top kayaks were new to me in 03 so, shopping around for a lightweight, sit on top boat, was no easy chore. I found that the most popular kayaks were much heavier than I was used to, and didn't accelerate through the water as had the kayaks of my youth. The carbon paddles, however, were far superior to the wooden paddles I was used to.

The first SOT I purchased was a Wilderness sixteen footer. I combined that with a Werner carbon twist grip paddle. Although quite heavy, and requiring a rudder for wind travel, it served me well for my first year on the water. This first year of kayak fishing...,along with the following 17 years...,was greatly enhanced due to my membership in P.A.C.K. A great bunch of guys from all walks of life who share a love for kayak fishing, primitive camping, and the camaraderie that accompanies such activities.
An old Eagle Scout's ideal place to be.

During my second year 'on the water' I read about a kayak made by SEDA in San Diago. It was the SEDA Revenge. It featured a well regarded 17 ft. by 25 in. kevlar ocean cruising hull, a comfortable sit on top self draining cockpit, and an overall weight of 40 pounds. Reach forward to engage the water with your paddle blade, initiate a proper return stroke...,the kayak glides forward and your properly stroked paddle blade ends up at the point where your stroke began...,the boat gliding through the water as if it was on ice..

I actually found a used one in a kayak shop in the Woodlands and purchased it on the spot.
This was not a boat for everyone. One rather famous Gulf Coast kayak guide paddled it around for fifteen minutes, came back, and when I asked him what he thought about the boat, he replied, without hesitation, "your crazy!". It was, however, the boat for me. I relished each moment I spent on the water with that kayak. The youngsters couldn't figure out why they couldn't keep with the old man. It was the kayak stupid, and the paddle, and knowing how to paddle effortlessly.

Along with the SEDA, I've owned at various times, about five different kayaks for different reasons. My kayaking days came to an end about a year ago, but I only recently got rid of the SEDA.

My point in sharing this is to pass on that kayak fishing is many things to many different people. Why it is, and what it might become to you, is probably not known at this time. So, rather than see how many gidgets and gadgets you can add onto your boat, perhaps you should first attempt to see how few additions you can add (a rudder is a necessity due to our Coastal winds).

Examples:
Why put on an anchor trolly when there is an easier, more effective way way?

Why put rod holders everywhere when you only need one?

Why purchase a trailor when there are inexpensive gizmos that enable you to safely carry your yak in the bed of your truck?

And why read ads for kayak gizmos when you should be reading about kayak safety, and fishing locations.

Have fun, catch fish, and be safe.

Great post! Thanks so much for sharing


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By Bowhunter8213
#2304992
JW FunGuy wrote:Hi Chris! Welcome to the club!

I’ve been a long time fisherman, fly mostly, I didn’t dig my casting rods out until I started fishing the salt. I have been kayaking almost as long as I have been fly fishing, whitewater mostly then kayak touring when I moved from the mountains. I hadn’t put the two together until a couple of years ago when I tried this at the coast. Thing is I still love to paddle, I love to explore new channels, marshes etc. I love to see the various birds, wildlife, dolphins, all that the coast has to offer. And yes I love to catch fish and bring some home to eat. Some people think I’m weird when I say for me it is probably 80% the kayaking and 20% the fishing, I know those numbers change on given trips, too much wind, too much water, not enough water. And those numbers do help when you don’t catch anything! But the point here is, and a big part of this forum, is the kayak. Learn how to use it, how to paddle properly and efficiently, same with turning. Then rig it out in a way that suits your style (there are tons of ideas here). But most of all just go out, enjoy Yourself and be Safe!
Maybe we will run into each other someplace.

Agreed and hopefully I’m able to meet a lot of folks from here. Would definitely be fun!


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By Kayak Kid
#2304997
Lol. I draw the line at one rod holder, definitely for a beginner. More than adequate for a minimalist who abhors clutter on any boat. One rod holder for my fly rod.

Trolly systems are, to me, additional clutter. But then, I seldom, if ever, fish in water over 4' deep. I prefer that my anchor is attached directly to the prow or stern with about 20 ft of line. I have a line that is attached to the anchor line, about 6 ft from where the anchor line is attached to the prow or to the stern. To hoist anchor, I just pull the anchor line to me with the 'assist' line, coil the retrieved anchor and assist line, boat the anchor, attache the coiled lines to a modified Velcro paddle clip and I'm on my way. I prefer casting down wind, so my anchor line is usually attached to my stern.

I always have a drift sock on board, but never thought to use it in a severe blow. Darn good idea.

I've been in a couple of big winds (05 tournament in Rockport) but, my rudder and paddle kept me in a straight line with the wind. I was told we had 70 knot winds whipping through Light House flats that day. I think I hit round 50 mph as I headed for the mangroves.
User avatar
By Ron Mc
#2305006
KK, anchor trolleys have nothing to do with water depth, and their greatest use is drift fishing the flats with a sock - making the very best out of beating coast wind - making you want wind - making you prefer big coast wind over calm.
I hope this thing is on.

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cluttered boat
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horse hockey on riding 50 knot wind with paddle - the limit of control of any kayak is somewhere below 30 kt, and many won't make that - even 2' water produces 2' waves at 30 kt, the wind shears a kayak hull across the water surface, to beam-reach windcock and instant flip.
This is sheltered water at 20 kt.
The force of the wind increases with the geometric cube of wind velocity.
Image
User avatar
By Ron Mc
#2305009
Tom, you go home in 10-kt wind - that's when I begin fishing, unless I'm wading on fish with a fly rod.

Image
Here's Neumie using his drift sock in 18-kt
Imagewanna say something like don't try this at home boys and girls,
but you definitely can't do this without drift sock deployed at stern - 18 kt.
User avatar
By Ron Mc
#2305012
and that's awesome, bro.
I travel 3 hours, have to plan the day a week in advance by wind and tide, and most always plan 2 days with an overnight.
And then think on my feet, because NWS doesn't always know, even with 3 hours notice - see my last photo of Lew and redfish - it was supposed to be light E wind from the 2-hour forecast, but we went home in 25+gust NNE, and went shopping at Roy's - the NNE built and never quit all day (we went out at 16-kt with a forecast calm).
User avatar
By Ron Mc
#2305016
you certainly picked a great place to land - I like your cat, too, for sit-up tall fishing.
One guy, John H, I showed it on FFR - he can't paddle, and loves it for his use.
#2305026
Bowhunter8213 wrote:
imaoldmanyoungsalt wrote:Welcome Chris!
Always remember safety first and have fun. East Matty is a good place to fish. I love it there! So what Yak did you get?


Will repost my comment - edit isn't coming out right






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#2305028
Bowhunter8213 wrote:
imaoldmanyoungsalt wrote:Welcome Chris!
Always remember safety first and have fun. East Matty is a good place to fish. I love it there! So what Yak did you get?

The wife bought us (2) of the Pelican Mustang 120X. All we could afford, but it will get the job done! Really excited about this!


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You should be excited. Kayak fishing or even just kayaking in general is a blast. Seeing things from water level and battling fish at that level, up close and personal, gets the adrenaline pumping in a whole new way! It's fishings equivalent of bowhunting. And by your screen name I'm guessing you'll understand my comparison.

Oh, and nothing wrong with those kayaks. I say start cheap (inexpensive) and work your way up to what you want later anyway. You'll be able to recoupe a good chunk of your money on those when or if you decide to upgrade later and when they're inexpensive to begin with your losses are minimal. I like the seats in those. They look comfy n dry.

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By Bowhunter8213
#2305039
Does anyone have any advice in fishing Hog Island in Matagorda? I fished there a bunch about 10 years ago, but not much since then. Im headed there in the morning - with this wind it will be tough I’m sure.


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