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Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


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By Light Keeper's Kid
#1337204
Once you have your hull built and before building the forward and aft decks,I realize that it would be a good idea to take the hull out loaded with the gear you plan on always having on board and as you are paddling move your seat forward and aft to see the best preforming position. But is there a standard or best water level for the very point of the bow to be as far as cutting the water or is it ok for the bow to be some what out off the water and if it is out of the water does this cause preformance problems :?:

Mike
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By gerald
#1337215
Depending on the hull, slightly stern down is usually best for good overall performance. Sometimes a boat will be more maneuverable at neutral trim. Bow down trim is a bear to paddle with. The biggest positive for bow down is when you want to make a 180 degree turn in the length of the boat. That's why we have sliding seats in race boats, but we sure don't want to paddle with a bow down condition. Quartering seas and wind also dictate how you want to trim. Go out and practice with exaggerated trim levels and you'll get the idea real quick. But always know where your best performing trim level is and how to get there. Seat position or cargo loading.
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By gerald
#1337448
Light Keeper's Kid wrote:Ah,so it would be a great idea not to permently mount a seat in just one position :?: Heading in quartering winds would a bow down be the best position :?:

Mike


I always get caught trying to give a simple answer for complicated questions. A multi-position seat is really nice to have but not a necessity. You usually don't need to change trim in most single trips. In quartering waves you want the boat to slice directly through the wave at which ever angle you are going. That's hard to do with some boats. A bow down situation might make the boat turn into the waves too much. This just depends on your paddling skills, the boat, and the direction you are trying to go. I have been out in wind and waves where I had no choice but to turn into the waves and ferry sideways to get where I'm going. Big, honking, gnarly waves...
Time on the water in a variety of conditions will help you learn. I get amused with people who say they've been paddling for 12 years and never turned the boat over. Where do they paddle? A big bathtub? I practice turning over (at least that's what I say). In really bad conditions I'll get out in a fairly safe cove or flat and play in the waves.
Playing in waves will show you that when running with the waves a bow down (heavy) condition may cause you to pearl and/or broach. You'll probably go over then. So--a neutral or slightly stern heavy trim is usually the best. I prefer the slightly stern heavy condition because I'm always going fast in a relatively straight line for a long time....
Shape of the boat has a lot to do with this as well. You can have a straight keel boat (no rocker) that is cut back on the ends which looks like rocker but it isn't. The effect is still almost the same, but best of both worlds. Straight tracking and good maneuverability.
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By gerald
#1337685
We're not talking about that much stern down trim. Maybe an inch difference between the ends. Still pretty close to neutral, but what I call stern down. That's what I mean about trying to give simple answers. There are simply too many variables. A little general knowledge and experience will reveal the answers. Of course--some people don't care much about paddling and handling. They just want to muddle out a few hundred yards and FISH. Nothing wrong with that...

...and things can change dramatically when you add a rudder or skeg...
By DSmithla
#1337697
gerald wrote:We're not talking about that much stern down trim. Maybe an inch difference between the ends. Still pretty close to neutral, but what I call stern down. That's what I mean about trying to give simple answers. There are simply too many variables. A little general knowledge and experience will reveal the answers. Of course--some people don't care much about paddling and handling. They just want to muddle out a few hundred yards and FISH. Nothing wrong with that...



o.k. that explains it. I'm deep into comparing skegs and rudders and the virtues of each. And for just a second I was really confused. BTW, I'm currently (by that I mean this week) leaning toward the ultimate design being a fairly well rockered boat with a drop down skeg not too near the stern. Of course next week, I'll probably be all hooked on baidarkas or something.
By DSmithla
#1337796
gerald wrote:I haven't managed to find that ultimate design yet--but I'm still looking...



Now I've got to tell you, from a pure fishing perspective (I hate to paddle barges), some of your boats are dang close to ultimate (the rockered boat with a skeg is for when I'm out paddling and not planning on fishing, more just a play/cruise boat).
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