TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


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By bowgarguide
#1276070
Gerald
do you precoat with epoxy before you run your filets.
Ron
User avatar
By gerald
#1276154
No. I do a small fillet between stitches--if doing S&G. After that cures, I pull the wires, then do the final fillet. I do a precoat after everything is filleted, shaped, and sanded. Fill holes and cracks that need to be filled. Then I sand again, apply the cloth and do the saturation coat.
By TexaRican
#1276369
When I first started researching S&G boatbuilding years ago primarily through Glen-L, they advocated precoating all plywood before any filleting. After building 1 boat, I totally agree with Gerald and don't see a need to precoat before fillets. Just goes to show that you can read, read, read but only truly learn by doing or at least asking someone with lots of experience who will give you a commons sense answer. Gerald :D
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By gerald
#1276463
There are two basic reasons I precoat. One is to bring the wood to the color it will be so I can color match the goopie (as much as I want) for filling holes and cracks. The other reason is that I get a more consistent saturation coat. I sand the fill coat before applying the cloth.
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By Pogo
#1277111
Just thought I'd toss in a disjointed alternative viewpoint . . . .

I leave the wires in the boat, just fillet right over them on the inside, then clip 'em off as flush as possible and sand 'em smooth on the outside. Well, I'll try to pull 'em out, and if they'll come easily great, but if not I leave 'em. I lay in the fillets all at once, then glass right away while the goopie's still goopy. That way the fillets conform nicely and there's no sanding. But you gotta lay in and wet out the cloth with a little bit of care to keep the fillets from migrating around. It doesn't require amazing skill; I did fine on my very first boat. But the more careful you are, the better the results look . . . no, really. :lol:

I never precoated yet, and have to warn that the bare wood tends to suck the fillets dry a little, but I never had any problem result from it. I tend to look at S&G as a really fast way to develop a hull, and take full advantage of it. But then, every time I build a boat my method evolves a little, more or less, in one direction or another. I think the same is more or less true with every boat builder that ever lived.

Gerald, have you settled into a routine, or are you still exploring for the best way (laying in your fillets)? Did you always "stitch" your fillets, or did you start somewhere along the line? If so, when and why?
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By Pogo
#1277249
Ron, I left 'em in for the express purpose of proving to you that I'm not a total freak about light weight at any cost. Of course, I did that five or six years before I ever knew you even existed, but I did that on purpose also, to prove how incredibly smart, talented, and good-looking I am. :?
User avatar
By gerald
#1277846
Pogo wrote:J


Gerald, have you settled into a routine, or are you still exploring for the best way (laying in your fillets)? Did you always "stitch" your fillets, or did you start somewhere along the line? If so, when and why?


I have settled into a routine of slowly evolving methods along the way. Very early I did leave the stitches in the fillet on a boat or two but quickly determined that I didn't like it. While I may continue to evolve my methods it won't include leaving the wire stitches in the fillet.
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By Pogo
#1277866
That wasn't what I was asking. Roll the "Cool Hand Luke" credits again . . . . . . :P

On another note, it looks like I'll be at the Duckworks Magnolia Beach Messabout tomorrow (6-13-09). I have two digital cameras with me, and know how to use 'em. 8) Getting a wireless connection good enough to post photos may be another story. Ought to have something in a couple weeks in any case. I'm in no hurry to get home, 'cuz there's a half-finished OI waiting there for me. Oh man, I'd hate to have to do a bunch of boat building again.
User avatar
By gerald
#1277974
Pogo wrote:That wasn't what I was asking. Roll the "Cool Hand Luke" credits again . . . . . . :P



...actually it's probably the fat daddy credits. I'm not certain if anybody can ever answer your questions (statements) satisfactorily because I'm not sure anybody knows what answer you're looking for other than the answer you are wanting to hear. I can explain something in detail in response to a question and you'll pick up on something totally unrelated to the crux of the matter as "the" reason for the result. Flexibility in mind, spirit, attitude and a willingness to explore that which we might learn from others is a good thing. I try, I fail, I try again...but I may fail again. I don't care. I'll try again....I'll probably fail again....
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By Pogo
#1278186
We're all learning, no question about it. Now I guess i need to learn what fat daddy is . . . or not. :P

At any rate, I attended the Duckworks Messabout, and boy, did I ever have a GREAT time!! :D There's all sorts of stuff we kayak builders can learn from them, and vice versa. I was also struck, as I have been many times, how isolated and fragmented we boat builders are. People who build strip kayaks are isolated from strip canoe makers, both are isolated from pirogue builders, all are isolated from bigger boat makers, and so on and so forth. I'm speaking generally, of course, and certainly there are a few who "cross lines" and check out what everyone else is doing. But they're mighty rare birds. And boy, could we ever have a lot of fun learning from each other.

A bunch of people were fascinated with my bird's mouth hollow shaft paddles, and I had a lot of fun explaining the process and showing my cut-off scrap pieces as examples. It was amusing to say the least, because I had gotten the inspiration from folks at this very Messabout the year before last! :lol: They remembered my rolling demonstrations, and were happy to have me back for repeat performances. I got several great sailboat rides out of the deal, too.

One guy walked up and asked me if we hadn't met at OkoumeFest in 1996, the CLC factory wood boat show held in Annapolis every year. Why yes we had! He lives in Dallas and was there on business and learned about the show on Duckworks, and I was there as a guest of CLC to do demonstrations and conduct clinics. And now we meet once again in Magnolia Beach. Tell ya, if that don't just beat all . . . . . .

If any of y'all were impressed with the quality of the company at Inks Lake, lemme tell you, there's nothing missing from the Duckworks crowd. I was among friends, just hadn't met 'em 'til now.

Edit: Since I'm all sunburned to hell, I sat in the camper this evening and d/l'ed my photos. I'm already excited about the great report I'll be bringing to y'all, as soon as I get an internet connection that'll support the endeavor. Which means when I get home. Be sometime after June 22 or so.

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