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Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


User avatar
By bowgarguide
#1252959
The new guys here,don't get scared off and think you have to have a full wood working shop to build a stitch and glue boat.
You can build one with three tools all that are pretty inexpensive ,drill ,jig saw,and a random orbital sander.
All the rest is icing on the cake.
Ron
User avatar
By gerald
#1253009
I agree with Ron. You can build a very nice boat with very few tools. For an S&G you can cut the panels with a sabre saw (jig saw). Nothing fancy there. The cut really doesn't have to be that good. Yep...a drill, Random orbit sander--what else? A utility knife is good--I call it a sheetrock knife since that's what I used it on for many years. I'm sure I'll think of something else later.

For a strip built boat it takes about the same tools. You can borrow a tablesaw and cut the strips. Clamps are nice to have, but that's what Harbor freight, Lowe's, and Home Depot are for. It doesn't take much.
User avatar
By Pogo
#1253146
I'm going to recommend going to Lowe's and picking up a Stanley Contractor's Grade block plane for ~$28. It's a great tool for boat building, and while it comes with a bit of a learning curve, the education you get from it is readily transferrable to other endeavors. You learn about tool tuning, blade sharpening, finesse, all sorts of cool stuff . . . and makes you feel like a real old-time craftsman every time you pile up a bunch of those curly shavings at your feet.

Heck, I think one of the very best parts about learning to build boats is the (re)introduction you get to hand tools.
User avatar
By preacher
#1253810
I refuse to believe any of this and my wife will not be allowed to read this post. I am also canceling your man card effective immediately unless you go buy a new tool you don't need.

:shock:
By barditch
#1254062
preacher wrote:I refuse to believe any of this and my wife will not be allowed to read this post. I am also canceling your man card effective immediately unless you go buy a new tool you don't need.

:shock:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Darned good thing I wasn't drinking coffee when I read that one, or I'd be buying my second keyboard for the month!!!
User avatar
By bowgarguide
#1254269
Preacher
You just have to explain it to her in the proper way.
Like this for example. Yes darlin you can build a boat with just a few simple tools,buttt you may want to ride in it one day and to build something that will be equal in looks to you is going to take a lot more tools. :D :D

Pogo
what would you use a block plane for on a stich and glue boat.
Ron
By TexaRican
#1254350
I'm just a rookie, but I used my block plane on my S&G. Was not happy with the accuracy of my jig saw so I cut well outside the line and planed it down to the line on my panel cuts. The plans said I did not need that level of accuracy, but I could could not believe it.
Probably could have accomplished the same task with the belt sander.
By barditch
#1254402
:D Love your attitude, Pepperfool! That block plane skill will pay off in the long run. The belt sander is cool but it can eat wood faster than a mad woman can spend money!
User avatar
By gerald
#1254500
bowgarguide wrote:With a block plane on the edge of plywood doesn't it tend to chip out?
Ron


Not if you use the right technique with a sharp block plane. The biggest danger area is the finishing corner. Stop and come back from that corner. Alternately you could clamp a block on there to keep it from chipping out. Too much trouble for me. I just plane from both directions when the little corner chip out would be a problem.
User avatar
By gerald
#1254505
Pepperfool wrote:I'm just a rookie, but I used my block plane on my S&G. Was not happy with the accuracy of my jig saw so I cut well outside the line and planed it down to the line on my panel cuts. The plans said I did not need that level of accuracy, but I could could not believe it.
Probably could have accomplished the same task with the belt sander.


I generally cut the line and plane the humps. Sometimes I just ignore the humps. No biggie. Doesn't have to be perfect. I guess, in this case, your plans were correct.
User avatar
By Pogo
#1255113
Sorry for the delay in responding, I'm already on the road slowly making my way to Inks Lake. Ron, your question practically caught me off guard . . . oh man, I use the block plane for just everything! I hardly ever use sandpaper or rasps for building S&G's, it's pretty much all done with saws and a block plane. Sandpaper's for finish work.

I got famous on another forum for always saying this one thing over and over like a broken record, and ought to continue droning it here: Do whatever works best for you. I'll talk up a storm about how wonderful a plane is, but it doesn't mean anyone else should or should not do as I do. Just sayin'. Bujt I do love my classic quiet hand tools.
User avatar
By bowgarguide
#1255118
I have used planes on solid wood wit good results ,building wooden bow I use a spoke shaven and planes a lot.
On the boats my routine is cut outside the line and take a belt sander to take it down. If I have twp pieces that are the same I will screw them together and sand both at once.

Different strokes :D
Ron
User avatar
By AyJay
#1256002
"Tools" you also need: A good T square, a framing square is nice, too. 2 sawhorses. A good tape measure and a precise yardstick. A long straightedge, and a consistently flexible batten for forming smooth curves. Some stretchy fishing line for making true straight lines between 2 points. Sometimes you also need some weights for gluing if you don't have bricks, blocks, paint buckets, gallon jugs, etc.

A box of vinyl gloves. Box of wooden "tongue depresssors". Dust masks, and some good fitting goggles.

I highly recommend a shop vac that you can attach to the dust catcher for your orbital sander. That cuts down dust 90%.
User avatar
By AyJay
#1256003
I find that 1/16 and 1/8 deviations on cuts on hull panels and the like are not significant in stitch and glue, where 1/8 inch gaps are the rule, and actually desireable.
User avatar
By bowgarguide
#1256153
First this is not to start an argument ,it is just a statement of how I build s@g and why.
A little back ground ,all my life I did the layout in a steel fabrication shop ,maybe a lot of my ideals are from there.
Cutting a line with a jig saw,or anykind of saw, good straight marks, line one edge of the blade up with one side of the mark ,this gives you a very small line to cut and you will be amazed the difference it makes in the accuracy of the cut.I line up the cut on the outside of the line this lets me sand back into that line very easily.

If you are off 1/8 inch on 5 seams that is 5/8 that you have to fight.

Using spacers are not. I have done it both ways and both ways will work, I don't use them anymore and I find if I have good straight cuts I get a much straighter edge not using them, structuraly as long as you get epoxy coated in the gaps both ways work.
As I stated in the first of this post layout was my job for 43 years ( old ain't I) the more accurate your material is cut the easier it is to have a straight ,smooth and symmetrical job , now if you have a little hickup in a fit you can fix it ,it is just harder to do.
Ron
One mans 2 cents
User avatar
By Pogo
#1256472
I agree with Ron, and particularly enjoyed this line: "If you are off 1/8 inch on 5 seams that is 5/8 that you have to fight."

I shudder a little whenever I hear people talk about the amount of "fudge factor" you can get away with; I mean, sure, it's true and all, but as Ron says whenever you accumulate errors you tend to have to pay the piper somewhere down the line. The better the panels mate to each other, the smoother everything else will go from there.
User avatar
By Night Wing
#1256499
It might be of tremendous help to others who are thinking of building a boat, but don't know what tools are needed to build a wooden boat, to make a list of the tools that are actually needed. Then, put it in a Sticky on this forum. Otherwise, this topic will eventually go to Page 2, Page 3, etc and it will get "lost". Just food for thought.
User avatar
By gerald
#1256577
Night Wing wrote:It might be of tremendous help to others who are thinking of building a boat, but don't know what tools are needed to build a wooden boat, to make a list of the tools that are actually needed. Then, put it in a Sticky on this forum. Otherwise, this topic will eventually go to Page 2, Page 3, etc and it will get "lost". Just food for thought.


Good idea. I may just do that after the Roundup. I'm going to be sparing with the stickies, but this may be one we do. An alternative is a sticky with links to articles that detail certain subjects like that.
User avatar
By AyJay
#1256877
You're assuming the 1/8 off will be cumulative, when odds are it is offsetting, 1/8 more, 1/8 less, putting you back at zero. Still, I agree it is easier if it is closer to perfect, but I've yet to run across a set of plans where the measurements for the curvature of the panels was precise to within 1/16 inch deviation, and you do need some space between the panels for fillets, and some spacing to give flexibility in order to line them up when stitched. My preference is to not sweat 1/8 inch or 1//16 inch here or there, and let the epoxy fillet putty deal with slight gap variations, so long as I can keep the symmetry intact. The time saved is considerable, and the end product typically not effected once you complete filleting, sanding, glassing, fairing, etc. The only problem is you occasionally have a bit of a fit issue with a bulkhead or frame, but again, fillet putty, orbital sander and dremel+sanding wheel can save the day.

To me, alignment and symmetry are the more important issues. A slightly warped boat will pull to one side or the other noticeably. I do cut both mirrored panels at the same time (double thick) to ensure the shape of the curvature is identical, and that really helps with the symmetry. The real pain is splicing panels, and keeping the spliced panel symmetrical AND properly fitted to the curvature of the panels they join to.

I forgot to add that: High speed dremel with a 3/4 inch sanding drump makes KILLER smooth and uniform fillets, even if you slop them up when you are making them. Makes glassing much easier.
User avatar
By DarrellS
#1256943
gerald wrote:
Night Wing wrote:It might be of tremendous help to others who are thinking of building a boat, but don't know what tools are needed to build a wooden boat, to make a list of the tools that are actually needed. Then, put it in a Sticky on this forum. Otherwise, this topic will eventually go to Page 2, Page 3, etc and it will get "lost". Just food for thought.


Good idea. I may just do that after the Roundup. I'm going to be sparing with the stickies, but this may be one we do. An alternative is a sticky with links to articles that detail certain subjects like that.


gerlad, Ilike your idea of a sticky with certain links that way you can add or remove as you see fit. Keeps the number of stickies down. Kinda like Beve "Master Collection"
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