TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


By TexaRican
#1250571
What is the most critical tool, most used tool or most loved tool in your shop?

Here's mine: Late 70's craftsman belt drive table saw made in the good ol' USA. I upgraded from a cheap aluminum craftsman that performed well given the price but I could tip it over just by swinging my big butt into it. This one has a heavy cast iron top and is much more powerful. Got it really, really cheap from a guy around the corner and replaced several parts including the whole trunnion assembly. Found that cheap on ebay and the guy threw in a blade that probably costs more than I have in to this whole tool :) The best part is that it is whisper quiet compared to the direct drive one. I can saw all night with the doors shut and the neighbors never know it. I do plan to upgrade the fence eventually but this one locks down sturdy once I set it so it will do fine. Already practiced cutting some cedar strips :wink:
It has heavy steel wheels and the front ones have a spring loaded lowering mechanism that takes it from portable to stationary in just a twist. It is heavy enough that I can rip full sheets of plywood alone with outfeed rollers set up. Serves dual use as another workbench and catch-all table when not cutting too.
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By Turner
#1250627
That is a TOUGH one to call!! Below is a layout of my shop (or what it will be once I get everything out of storage.) A lot depends on the project I am doing at the time.. Almost all of the major Power Tools are on mobile stands. I do a lot of Scroll Saw work as well as Woodturning. The band saw gets a lot of use as it is quicker to set up than the table saw. But, once I get started on builing my 'Stripper', the Table saw will get a workout. Then a newly purchased Sand-Flea will remove the blade marks from the strips. The band saw will be used to cut the forms. I use 'em all and don't really have a Fav...... :roll:


garage.pdf
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By Pogo
#1250688
Should be a fun subject! :D

The clear star in my power tool lineup is my Delta 14" bandsaw. It was derelict when I discovered it, and I bought it for a song as junk. The major components of it responded in stellar fashion to TLC given from topmast to bilge, and it was treated to modern updates like graphite guide blocks, new poly tires, and a Carter quick-release tension lever. I say modern, because as near as my research was able to determine, the saw is a circa 1938 model! One major cool thing about it is parts for contemporary Delta 14" bandsaws fit just fine, so no exotic hard-to-find parts problems with it. Notable differences from newer ones are this old guy has stamped steel wheels instead of cast aluminum ones, and all the iron-work, especially the stand, are much heavier and more solid. She runs silky smooth, and is easily one of the most often used machine I own. In fact, I just had to replace the tires about a month ago.

She still runs on the original motor, by the way. I often wish she could speak and tell her history.
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By gerald
#1250695
Oh gosh. I have a lot of favorite tools. BUTfor me the shop has to start with a good heavy duty belt driven tablesaw. Then it goes on through a myriad of different tools. I do happen to have 20", 18", and 14" bandsaws, but they don't get used as much as you'd think. Good rounter, router tables, sanders of all kinds, drills, etc. I love tools. Several years ago my stepdaughter and one of her boyfriends absconded with about $4,000 worth and took them to a hockshop. Haven't got all the replacements yet.

I will
#1250761
My dad always lamented that he could be Norm Averams if somebody gave him the fifty grand worth of Jet and Delt tools in that guy's shop. Me, I get a kick out of building something beautiful on a sears budget.
I've written to DIY network and HGTV telling them to do some shows based on what an average guy has in his garage. Also to Speed and Spike telling them to quit showing some chic using a $2000 plasma cutter on a frame some dude spent hours cleaning up for her. Show a dirty engine and how a guy can install a part with only jack stands and a creeper. Work is easy when you can lift the car over your head but I don't know anybody that has that in their garage :lol:

BTW: what is board stretcher?
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By Greg77
#1250814
Pepperfool wrote:
BTW: what is board stretcher?


It's a tool that my grandfather said he once owned that he would use if he accidentaly cut a board too short. Unfortunatly, I think it was stolen or something so he came up with this crazy idea about measuring twice and cutting once or some such nonsence "cause we don't have no board stretcher".
By picaroon
#1250913
I have been an avid wood worker for many years but I am no where close to being in the same league as some of you guys. My shop has a little bit of everything in it.............I think the "Key Stone" tool of my shop is a model 66, 10' Powermatic table saw.....I have a 14" DELTA Band Saw, a 8" MODEL 60 Powermatic Joiner and a 15" Delta Planer and two Delta saw dust Vacumes...........Also a Dewalt 12" Scroll Saw.........and a bunch of hand tools including 4 routers.

Until October I had a 12" Rockwell Radial Arm Saw, a 17" Delta Drill Press and a 8" Varible Speed Delta Grinder. I gave these to a church to use in one of their programs and took the write off. I replaced the Radia Arm saw with a Dewalt 12" compound Miter Saw............................only yesterday I went out to buy a new Drill Press and grinder. The Delta replacements were all made in China and are junk. At this point I refuse to buy something made in China so I will either find something made here or find something used in real good shape......

Some of this stuff I inherited but most I have purchased a little at a time over the past 50 plus years. Most of this stuff was a bargin when I bought it. The table saw for example came from a Hardware store in Mississippi that was going out of business. I paid $1,400 for it and had a friend who was going to Ole Miss bring it to me here in Houston.....................Some of the stuff was purchased out of estates and bankruptcies..........In one bankruptcy I did not bid on a single piece of machinery. I did notice a tool cabinet of drill bits, new router cutters, saw blades, dado blades, Sterrett tools, Stanley Planes etc. Some of it was a little rusty. Some new still in their original plastic boxes. I offered $100.00 and bought it all..............

At a time my company sponsored Norm Abram and I was able to meet him several times. He is a real down to earth guy...........just a carpenter who got lucky..........
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By gerald
#1251034
Pepperfool wrote:
BTW: what is board stretcher?


A board stretcher is used when you cut the board too short or need it just a tad longer. Another nice tool is a left handed gap slapper for when your joint isn't quite as good as it should be. I'm always slapping the gaps. Make sure you get the left handed one. The right handed one doesn't work nearly as well.
By TexaRican
#1251186
gerald wrote:
Pepperfool wrote:
BTW: what is board stretcher?


A board stretcher is used when you cut the board too short or need it just a tad longer. Another nice tool is a left handed gap slapper for when your joint isn't quite as good as it should be. I'm always slapping the gaps. Make sure you get the left handed one. The right handed one doesn't work nearly as well.


:oops: Ok, don't rub it in, Greg already told me :lol: Sounds like something my grandpa and his crew would have duped me with on the construction site when I was little - and I'm still falling for it :lol:
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By preacher
#1251401
I just got me a new Delta Pro 10" table saw, belt drive 220v and it is sweet, maybe Xtra-sweet. But, my favorite tool in my shop is still my fishing pole.

Seriously, how do you pick? That's like answering the question, "which of your kids do you love most?"
By TexaRican
#1251423
preacher wrote:I just got me a new Delta Pro 10" table saw, belt drive 220v and it is sweet, maybe Xtra-sweet. But, my favorite tool in my shop is still my fishing pole.

Seriously, how do you pick? That's like answering the question, "which of your kids do you love most?"


Ok, if your shop was on fire, what tool would you pull out first?
By Tombo
#1251428
Pepperfool wrote:
preacher wrote:I just got me a new Delta Pro 10" table saw, belt drive 220v and it is sweet, maybe Xtra-sweet. But, my favorite tool in my shop is still my fishing pole.

Seriously, how do you pick? That's like answering the question, "which of your kids do you love most?"


Ok, if your shop was on fire, what tool would you pull out first?


Easy, fire extinguisher. Next would be my Makita 18v Lithium Ion impact drill. Great little tool for just about all things using bits.
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By Pogo
#1251433
I'd have to say the table saw. It costs the most, and is the center of my shop's little universe. The loss of any other tool could not hobble me more thoroughly. Must have a table saw as the basis for almost everything else.

Besides, it's closest to the door, and on a mobile base. 8)

After that, it'd almost be a toss-up between the bandsaw and stationary belt sander; but the bandsaw would win by virtue of its higher replacement cost. One thing I'd have genuine trouble with would be trying to choose between the jointer and thickness planer. Probably the planer, again because of higher replacement cost and also its portability. The radial arm saw is low on the list, but not because I don't use it. In fact, I'm nuts about it, but it's a genuine 100% pure luxury item I'd hate to lose, but can easily do without if I had to.
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By Greg77
#1251543
[quote="Pepperfool"]What is the most critical tool, most used tool or most loved tool in your shop?

Here's mine: Late 70's craftsman belt drive table saw I do plan to upgrade the fence eventually but this one locks down sturdy once I set it so it will do fine. quote]

You will not believe how much a quality fence will add to the usefulness of a table saw. I had the same fence on a craftsman saw and spent half my time tapping it around to get it parallel to the blade before locking it down. I now have a Delta saw with the unifence and it is on the money every time.
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By preacher
#1251761
Pepperfool wrote:
preacher wrote:I just got me a new Delta Pro 10" table saw, belt drive 220v and it is sweet, maybe Xtra-sweet. But, my favorite tool in my shop is still my fishing pole.

Seriously, how do you pick? That's like answering the question, "which of your kids do you love most?"


Ok, if your shop was on fire, what tool would you pull out first?



UH! The Fleetwood Bounder
By rodloos
#1251797
Man, some of you guys have have some really nice equipment.

Is it possible to build a boat if you don't even own a table saw? I have a skilsaw and several Ryobi battery-powered tools, but no table saw. I had figured I might start off with one of the inexpensive table saws at Home Depot, but is it just a waste of money to get a cheap table saw (say under $150-200)? If I had to purchase a $1000 saw to be able to do it right, then I'm sure I would never attempt building a boat!

Clearing out the space in my garage is a whole 'nuther challenge.
By picaroon
#1251863
Rodloos.............half the so called "custom cabinets" in Houston were built with a Delta Contractors saw........properly tuned with a good fence and blade you can do just about anything with this saw.........I suspect that a good used one can be had for around $500.00 to $750.00.................start looking around.......who knows you might find a deal.......thats how you build a shop............one tool at a time.........
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By Pogo
#1251866
One of the best professional woodworkers I've ever known kept an El Cheapo garage sale table saw at home. I mean this thing was CHEAP! Cheesy little Sears thing on a really lightweight stand, anytime he fed stock into it he had to keep one foot on the stand to keep the thing from tipping over backward. He built a whole houseful of furniture using that saw, a router (classic Porter-Cable 690), and a sander. The hutch for the dining room was a masterpiece of craftsmanship. I can vouch for the veracity of this story because that guy was my late brother. I was with him when he bought that saw, paid $30 for it.

Basically, you can do whatever you want to do, if you want to do it bad enough. You'll figure a way.

S&G boats don't require a table saw.

I use a Delta Contractor's Saw, equipped with a Unifence, extension table with router table insert (homemade), and mobile base. ANY saw should be properly tuned for best performance. Agree with Picaroon, impressive shop collections are generally the result of years of buying one tool at a time.
By TexaRican
#1252000
rodloos wrote:Man, some of you guys have have some really nice equipment.

Is it possible to build a boat if you don't even own a table saw? I have a skilsaw and several Ryobi battery-powered tools, but no table saw. I had figured I might start off with one of the inexpensive table saws at Home Depot, but is it just a waste of money to get a cheap table saw (say under $150-200)? If I had to purchase a $1000 saw to be able to do it right, then I'm sure I would never attempt building a boat!

Clearing out the space in my garage is a whole 'nuther challenge.


As Pogo said, even a cheap table saw can do great work in the right hands. I remodeled my first home, a 1973 brady bunch special using that entry level craftsman saw that I bought for $129. Built a coffee table, 2 corner hutches, loft bed for my kid, bookshelves, list goes on.... Just make sure the fence will lock down well. You can tolerate one that is a pain to get parallel to the blade but if it moves once you start cutting, its totally worthless.

I used my table saw some on my pirogue but I could have done everything with my skil saw if I had to.

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