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#2126811
There was a post on another board where an angler was frustrated casting with braided lines. I've written several articles about this and here is the short notes of the articles.The right settings on the reel and either FINS Windtamer or Suffix Performance can eliminate a lot of frustration.

First, go to a park and put the braided line on very tight. Tie it to a post and then walk with rod and reel to empty spool. At bottom of spool, re engage spool and reel hard without moving to get tension on line. Slowly walk toward end of line to manage line tension. This really only has to be done the first time but will help with line digging in.

You don't have to cast easy with it, but it will take some time for you to get comfortable with throwing it hard and getting the distance. With that said, if you don't have the reel brakes and spool tension knob set correctly then you will get a backlash much more often.

Proper settings for casting reel
Spool tension knob (by reel handle, puts more or less tension on the spool; is used centering spool as well as putting base amount of friction on spool shaft at friction plate under knob).

1. tighten spool tension knob until line will not run out when reel is disengaged (thumb on reel, tighten knob a turn or two until just snug). With reel disengaged, you should be able to at this point take your thumb off the reel and spool will not free spool with the weight of lure you are casting. SLOWLY loosen spool tension knob until lure just barely begins to pull line out by its own weight.

Brake settings (various reels are different some are centrifugal, some magnetic, some both, and some like the new Lews Team Lite and BB2 Pro are a new breed of centrifugal allowing fine (infinite) adjustment of brakes (ie. not just 1 or 2 but infinite choice of how much or little braking power.
2. If you have a centrifugal brake set up, set / engage 2 brakes and close reel side plate.
2a. If you use a magnetic brake then set it to 6-7 on the side dial...maybe even 8 to start with.
2b If reel has both, set only the centrifugal brake initially.
2c. If new Lews mentioned above then set external brake setting for 5-6.

3. Now this setting is just the starting point. Make a cast, you shouldn't backlash at all, but distance will be minimal. Slowly reduce settings to loosen up reel.
3. if centrifugal brakes, slightly reduce the spool tension knob to get increased distance. At some point after a good bit of practice you'll reduce your brake setting to only 1 brake.
3a. Slowly reduce magnetic brake settings until you increase distance and only get slight overrun. Same for new Lews systems.
3b. If you have a reel with both slowly reduce the brake power but increase the mag to fine adjust your braking on the reel.

Feathering spool edge during cast.
4. As you cast, learn to practice putting your thumb on the edge of the spool to 'feather' the speed of the spool. This will take practice but in the end you'll be able to control your line on the spool with just the slight resistance on the spool with your thumb. You'll never only use your thumb but you can eventually open the settings up slightly more and feather the reel to get the most distance. With the new Lews system the new brakes are basically doing this for you.

Reel turn during cast
5. Some will turn a reel during the cast so the spool becomes vertical during the cast. For some reason this allows line to more smoothly exit the reel even if there is a slight over run. This will also take practice.

The basic idea to get used to casting braid with less backlash is start with tighter settings and slowly loosing them up. Following this list to adjust reel, you can also more quickly learn to cast harder which will get you more distance and allow you to also cast into the wind.
Take your time. Additionally, all of the above can be used with mono line to increase distance and reduce backlash.

Hope this helps you guys increase your cast distance and get more out of your casting reels.
T
#2127133
Great information.

I only have one question: For #3, you stated "At some point after a good bit of practice you'll reduce your brake setting to only 1 brake". I have always been under the impression that you wanted at least two brakes, diametrically opposed, engaged in order to keep the spool balanced. Is that incorrect?
#2127158
All sounds very good TS....I have used the "feather" technique for a while now and it works great....You can adjust how the spool/line releases by applying slight pressure with your thumb at the appropriate time during a cast (i.e. your thumb becomes another break allowing the line to spool off the reel more effectively)....I also use this for a "brake" when fishing inshore....Meaning that your thumb can assists as an added amount of drag if and when you need it (say to turn a fish when fishing lighter line - hope that makes sense!)....But....Old habits die hard....A group of us went BTB fishing last Friday with Mythman and company (my first BTB trip)....As a shark started to take my line, my old habits kicked in....I applied my thumb to add a little tension to the line....Just trying to "feel" the shark....Maybe to understand when I should set the hook....Well I felt him alright....When the shark felt the tug of my line he took off....Spooled out some line....And smoked my thumb in the process. :horse: Needless to say but I will think a little more about when and how I apply tension with my thumb in the future! :lol: Tight lines everyone!
#2127166
SteelRinger wrote:Great information.

I only have one question: For #3, you stated "At some point after a good bit of practice you'll reduce your brake setting to only 1 brake". I have always been under the impression that you wanted at least two brakes, diametrically opposed, engaged in order to keep the spool balanced. Is that incorrect?


Not correct - I run my chronarchs pretty much with one weight out only. I used to think the same thing, had to have an even number to stay in balance. Was fishing with a guide buddy, he was pretty consistently out casting me, we were throwing pretty light jigs, maybe 1/8 oz. He asked me how many you got out, said two, he said try one, I questioned it, he said just try it, and bingo, instant extra yards.

Usually run with power pro slick, flouro leader, and lighter jig heads. I have found that just a leeeetle thumb action about half way thru the cast, when going for max distance, sort of tames the impending overrun, just sort of taste the line with the thumb as it is getting to a bigger diameter, makes the almost backlash subside, and then pull thumb back, letting it roll from there to splashdown. Not a very good description, but.... if anyone else picks up one of my reels, it WILL backlash. Having it set super lite though, I can cast much further with lots less effort. Mainly a PB problem, from the yak, I don't usually cast as far.
#2171420
Yeah, no brakes is a whole different game all together. I'm not even there yet myself. LOL.

Using a single brake will only cause an infinitely small oscillation, can't even notice it. It's probably well within the designed parameters for the bearing anyway so no harm to the reel at all. Certainly get longer cast.

A lot of the newer reels like the Lews LFS systems are going to centrifugal brake systems that allow an infinite level of resistance to be applied from almost zero to plenty plus. I've since been throwing a Lews BB1 pro with the external adjust centrifugal braking system and have it set for just a very light feather of resistance against the spool. It's certainly less than 1 brake but more than zero brakes.
#2234404
MarshMikee wrote:
SteelRinger wrote:Great information.

I only have one question: For #3, you stated "At some point after a good bit of practice you'll reduce your brake setting to only 1 brake". I have always been under the impression that you wanted at least two brakes, diametrically opposed, engaged in order to keep the spool balanced. Is that incorrect?


Not correct - I run my chronarchs pretty much with one weight out only. I used to think the same thing, had to have an even number to stay in balance. Was fishing with a guide buddy, he was pretty consistently out casting me, we were throwing pretty light jigs, maybe 1/8 oz. He asked me how many you got out, said two, he said try one, I questioned it, he said just try it, and bingo, instant extra yards.

Usually run with power pro slick, flouro leader, and lighter jig heads. I have found that just a leeeetle thumb action about half way thru the cast, when going for max distance, sort of tames the impending overrun, just sort of taste the line with the thumb as it is getting to a bigger diameter, makes the almost backlash subside, and then pull thumb back, letting it roll from there to splashdown. Not a very good description, but.... if anyone else picks up one of my reels, it WILL backlash. Having it set super lite though, I can cast much further with lots less effort. Mainly a PB problem, from the yak, I don't usually cast as far.


well said and great description of the finer details of 'thumbing' or 'feathering' ... loved it "just taste the line with the thumb". Sometimes I cast far and sometimes I cast and catch reds at my feet. When you see a blow up at the end of your range it's nice to know that you can 'reach out and touch someone'.. I think learning to cast both far and accurately is important and I think learning one will increase your confidence to do the other.
#2234822
TroutSupport.com wrote:Reel turn during cast
5. Some will turn a reel during the cast so the spool becomes vertical during the cast. For some reason this allows line to more smoothly exit the reel even if there is a slight over run. This will also take practice.
T


I tried this today at the local lake and I got 3 - 5 additional yards on each cast. Couldn't believe it.
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