TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


By TBKB
#2316100
Hey folks, i recently picked up an older Pelican Castaway 116 DLX for less than a tank of gas in my truck. It had broken handles, missing the cover lid, and had just been mistreated. After a few minutes on Amazon, I was able to correct most of that. Took it out to a small little stream over here near Anahuac for my maiden voyage just because this spot is secluded and I knew I wouldn't be in anyone's way. Other than deciding within 5 minutes to order some scupper plugs, I had an enjoyable few hours just getting the feel of the yak. I did decide I am lazy, so a trolling motor is going to happen :lol:

Here's to my newest way to waste money and irritate the wife lol
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By TexasJim
#2316111
A great way to NOT waste your money, AND insure that your wife can stay happy, is to invest in a quality, comfortable, designed-for-paddling PFD. One you will ALWAYS wear, even in hot conditions and three feet of water. Plan on spending $100 or more, but do your research, and buy the right one, once. It's fine to cheap out on fishing tackle and clothing, but buy a good PFD. Lots of posts here on the subject you can search. Welcome to the plastic Navy, Ensign! TexasJim
User avatar
By impulse
#2316115
TBKB wrote:Hey folks, i recently picked up an older Pelican Castaway 116 DLX for less than a tank of gas in my truck. It had broken handles, missing the cover lid, and had just been mistreated. After a few minutes on Amazon, I was able to correct most of that. Took it out to a small little stream over here near Anahuac for my maiden voyage just because this spot is secluded and I knew I wouldn't be in anyone's way. Other than deciding within 5 minutes to order some scupper plugs, I had an enjoyable few hours just getting the feel of the yak. I did decide I am lazy, so a trolling motor is going to happen :lol:

Here's to my newest way to waste money and irritate the wife lol


Before you buy a trolling motor, understand that puts your kayak into the category of a power boat with the incumbent registration and titling required by the state of Texas. Make sure you can get a Manufacturer's Certificate of Origin if it's never been titled, or head on down to the TPWD and see what hoops you're going to have to jump through to get TX numbers and be legal BEFORE you start spending a lot of money on a trolling setup.

(Unless, of course, it already has TX numbers and you got a bill of sale and title from the previous owner, or you're planning to limit your activity to a private pond)

Hopefully, some others who have gone through the process will chime in with advice based on their experience.
User avatar
By Neumie
#2316179
Welcome, and glad you had a great first outing.

Another thing to be cautious about is weight on that kayak. I think it only has a weight capacity of 275 lbs. General rule of thumb when it comes to weight capacity is to stay around 70% - 75% of the stated weight capacity of a kayak to be safe; so around 200 lbs give or take for the Castaway 116.

I'm not sure how much you weight, but 15-20 lbs for the trolling motor and 45 - 60 lbs for the battery eats a ton of your weight capacity. Ignoring the general rule, your left with about 200 lbs weight capacity for yourself, gear, and tackle. It's cutting it pretty close.

I just want you to be safe on the water.
By TBKB
#2316309
TexasJim wrote:A great way to NOT waste your money, AND insure that your wife can stay happy, is to invest in a quality, comfortable, designed-for-paddling PFD. One you will ALWAYS wear, even in hot conditions and three feet of water. Plan on spending $100 or more, but do your research, and buy the right one, once. It's fine to cheap out on fishing tackle and clothing, but buy a good PFD. Lots of posts here on the subject you can search. Welcome to the plastic Navy, Ensign! TexasJim


Thanks, and that is on the list of quality things to get.. I have a cheap rinky one that will keep the good ol GW happy, but its burried inside the yak lol

impulse wrote:Before you buy a trolling motor, understand that puts your kayak into the category of a power boat with the incumbent registration and titling required by the state of Texas. Make sure you can get a Manufacturer's Certificate of Origin if it's never been titled, or head on down to the TPWD and see what hoops you're going to have to jump through to get TX numbers and be legal BEFORE you start spending a lot of money on a trolling setup.

(Unless, of course, it already has TX numbers and you got a bill of sale and title from the previous owner, or you're planning to limit your activity to a private pond)

Hopefully, some others who have gone through the process will chime in with advice based on their experience.


I have already been in contact with TPWD and got the forms ready to send in. I did take it out yesterday on what I will call a R&D test run to see what I need to do differently before I spend that money getting it registered. There are a few bugs I have to work out, and if I can't then I already have a buyer lined up for the battery and motor. I may not be 100% legal with it during testing phase, but if I get it all lined out, I will definately do what I need to do to be in complete compliance with TPWD and local laws!

Neumie wrote:Welcome, and glad you had a great first outing.

Another thing to be cautious about is weight on that kayak. I think it only has a weight capacity of 275 lbs. General rule of thumb when it comes to weight capacity is to stay around 70% - 75% of the stated weight capacity of a kayak to be safe; so around 200 lbs give or take for the Castaway 116.

I'm not sure how much you weight, but 15-20 lbs for the trolling motor and 45 - 60 lbs for the battery eats a ton of your weight capacity. Ignoring the general rule, your left with about 200 lbs weight capacity for yourself, gear, and tackle. It's cutting it pretty close.

I just want you to be safe on the water.


From what I can find, its a weigh cap of 350. The trolling motor is 16, and the battery I have is 24. 75% of 350 is 262.5 lbs. I am around 230ish, so when I add that 40lbs then I am a few pounds over. I may have another 5-10 pounds (if that) worth of tackle, rod/reel, paddle, phone, keys, etc. I calculated that I am sitting right around 80% +/- a hair.
By Tombo
#2316328
impulse wrote:
TBKB wrote:Hey folks, i recently picked up an older Pelican Castaway 116 DLX for less than a tank of gas in my truck. It had broken handles, missing the cover lid, and had just been mistreated. After a few minutes on Amazon, I was able to correct most of that. Took it out to a small little stream over here near Anahuac for my maiden voyage just because this spot is secluded and I knew I wouldn't be in anyone's way. Other than deciding within 5 minutes to order some scupper plugs, I had an enjoyable few hours just getting the feel of the yak. I did decide I am lazy, so a trolling motor is going to happen :lol:

Here's to my newest way to waste money and irritate the wife lol


Before you buy a trolling motor, understand that puts your kayak into the category of a power boat with the incumbent registration and titling required by the state of Texas. Make sure you can get a Manufacturer's Certificate of Origin if it's never been titled, or head on down to the TPWD and see what hoops you're going to have to jump through to get TX numbers and be legal BEFORE you start spending a lot of money on a trolling setup.

(Unless, of course, it already has TX numbers and you got a bill of sale and title from the previous owner, or you're planning to limit your activity to a private pond)

Hopefully, some others who have gone through the process will chime in with advice based on their experience.


If you do not have an MSO (Manufacture State of Origin) forget about getting registration numbers.
User avatar
By impulse
#2316330
Tombo wrote:If you do not have an MSO (Manufacture State of Origin) forget about getting registration numbers.


There have been other guys on this site who got MSO's directly from the manufacturer for kayaks they bought 2nd hand. I was hoping they'd chime in with their advice. I've never tried to do it, but I have no reason to doubt what they said.

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