TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


#2295899
Several years ago I built, and have kept updated, a Google Spreadsheet with a list of fishing kayaks available for sale in the US; about 264 models at the time of this post. They're broken up into three tabs: "SOTs/SUPs" (180 models), "Canoes/SINKs" (34 models), and "Other Brands" (29 models).

Here's the link to the Google Spread Sheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/ ... sp=sharing

Kayaks within the "SOTs/SUPs" tab are kayaks which are clearly SUPs or SOTs or have a self bailing deck; such as a Nucanoe. I only included SUPs from manufactures who also make kayaks, so companies like Live Watersports and Bote are not included. Kayaks within the "Canoes/SINKs" tab have seating positions at or below the waterline and do not have self bailing capabilities; think Native Watercraft Ultimates. The "Other Brands" tab has lesser known brands, mainly kayak models massed produced in China and are offered under numerous bran names. Within those tabs you'll find columns for length, width, weight of the kayak, carrying capacity, type of seat, pedal drive, rudder, MSRP (obviously some kayaks can be found cheaper than MSRP), manufacture of origin, parent company, and notes.

All of these options are sortable, but I've also pre-built filters to help narrow it down the kayaks you should be considering depending on where you are planning on fishing. I've broken these filters into 9 groups: Pedal Driven, Lakes, Coast, Rivers - Large, Rivers - Small, Camping, All Purpose, < $1,000, and <$750. You can access the filters by clicking Data - Filter Views.

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A couple of notes. Pedal drives within the filters are poorly represented, mainly due to their width. From a paddler's standpoint a kayak that's too wide is difficult to paddle, but if you're wanting to pedal most of the time then width isn't as big of a factor in your decision. For paddlers on lakes and at the coast I put emphasis on kayaks which a rudder is already installed or an optional upgrade. If you're wanting a kayak for lakes or down at the coast but don't want to add a rudder use the "Rivers - Large" filter.

Here are the criteria for each filter.

Pedal Driven
Self explanatory, these are kayaks which either come with or have the option to add a pedal drive.

Lakes
Length is between 11' 06" and 14' 01". Capacity is greater than 325 lbs (based on a 200 lbs paddler). It either has a rudder or has the option to add one.

Coast
Length is greater than or equal to 13' 00". Width is less than or equal to 30". Capacity is greater than or equal to 325 lbs (based on 200 lbs paddler). It either has a rudder or has the option to add one.

Rivers - Large
Kayaks for fishing the Brazos or Lower Colorado for example. Length between 11'02" and 14' 01". Width less than or equal to 38". Weight less than or equal to 105 lbs. Capacity is greater than or equal to 325 lbs (based on 200 lbs paddler).

Rivers - Small
Kayaks for the Upper Guadalupe, Frio, etc. Length between 10' 00" and 13' 00". Width less than or equal to 38". Kayak weight less than or equal to 90 lbs (easier for portaging). Capacity is greater than or equal to 325 lbs (based on 200 lbs paddler).

Camping
These are kayaks which offer higher weight capacities for carrying gear for over night camping trips. Length between 10' 06" and 14' 01". Capacity greater than or equal to 425 lbs (based on 200 lbs paddler).

All Purpose
These kayaks are ones which should be considered if you can only own one kayak and plan on fishing the coast, rivers, and doing overnight camping trips. Length Length between 11' 06" and 14' 01". Width less than or equal to 36". Capacity greater than or equal to 425 lbs (based on 200 lbs paddler). It either has a rudder or has the option to add one.

< $1,000
Self explanatory, these are kayaks with MSRP's equal to or less than $1,000.

< $750
Self explanatory, these are kayaks with MSRP's equal to or less than $750.
Last edited by Neumie on Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:43 am, edited 6 times in total.
#2295900
At the bottom you'll see additional tabs.

The fourth tab is for PFDs. Those are broken down into Men/Unisex, Women, Inflatable, and Kids. Within the men/Unisex and Women's PFDs they are broken down into High Back (meaning the the flotation on the back is higher up between the shoulder blades to clear seat backs found on SOT kayaks), High Back - Angler (have features geared towards anglers), Thin Back (the flotation on the back is f full length, but thin enough to not be cumbersome when leaning back in a kayak seat), and Thin Back - Angler. A few of the models come in Universal Sizing, but most you need to select the correct size for your build. Inflatable is broken down into Auto Suspenders, Manual Suspenders, and Manual Belt. Kids is broken down into Youth and Child sizes.

The fifth tab is for kayak paddles. The paddles within the spreadsheet are considered "high angle" paddles with shorter, but broader blade designs. Those are broken into standard and adjustable length. Adjustable length paddles are a good option for kayaks which have a high/low adjustable seat heights. Within those to categories the paddles are grouped by build materials. Group 1 is fiberglass shaft with fiberglass reinforced nylon blades. Group 2 is carbon fiber shaft with fiberglass reinforced nylon blades. Group 3 is carbon fiber shaft with carbon reinforced nylon blades. Group 4 is carbon fiber shaft with fiberglass blades. Group 5 is carbon fiber shaft with carbon fiber blades. You should choose the lightest paddle within your budget.

Let me know if you have any questions on any of these spreadsheets. I hope this information helps those new or are looking to upgrade.
Last edited by Neumie on Tue Nov 26, 2019 3:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#2295903
Running a hypothetical scenario.

Let's say I'm looking for a SOT kayak, less than 12 feet because it's as long a kayak I can store and transport, under 90 lbs because I have to car top it, I weigh 225 lbs so I need a kayak with a capacity of at least 350 lbs, I really like the comfort of the framed kayak seats, my max budget for just the kayak is $900, and because I don't approve of what's currently going on in China this fall of 2019 I don't want to purchase a kayak manufactured in China.

Here's what you'd need to do.

Step 1: Select Data - Filter Views - Create New Temporary Filter View.

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Step 2: Drop down the filter menu in the "Length" column and click on "Filter by Condition", then select "Less than or equal to", and then enter in " 12' 00" " (formatting here is important). Click OK.

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Step 3: Drop down the filter menu in the "Weight" column and click on "Filter by Condition", then select "Less than or equal to", and then enter in "90". Click OK.

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Step 4: Drop down the filter menu in the "Capacity" column and click on "Filter by Condition", then select "Greater than or equal to", and then enter in "350". Click OK.

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Step 5: Drop down the filter menu in the "Frame Seat" column and deselect "(Blanks)". Click OK.

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Step 6: Drop down the filter menu in the "MSRP" column and click on "Filter by Condition", then select "Less than or equal to", and then enter in "900". Click OK.

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Step 7: Drop down the filter menu in the "Place of Origin" column and deselect "China". Click OK.

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If you do this SOTs/SUPs kayak tab you'll whittle the lists down to 15 from 190. This would be a good starting point for looking at kayaks in this hypothetical situation.

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Last edited by Neumie on Tue Nov 26, 2019 4:04 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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