TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


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By JMS
#2255814
Okay sorry for all the posts stranded in St Louis when Chicago Airports closed yesterday....

Last November I attended Fly Casting course that included a Redington Path 5wt fly rod and I've been cutting my teeth chasing Guadalupe River Trout (Got my first Texas Brown Saturday)Image

My main objective though is not to chase Trout but catch Redfish on the fly. Lots of great information online on what type of set up, but after watching a video about Redington Predator rods they mention a 7ft 10 inch 8wt specifically for kayak fishing. Why would you need a shorter rod for a kayak other then being easier to maneuver.

Any advice would be appreciated

https://www.redington.com/fly-fishing-r ... duct-video


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By karstopo
#2255822
Having fished both 9' foot and shorter rods in the kayak for redfish, I'm a big fan of 8' or less rods when fly fishing from the kayak whether I stand, I do this mostly, or sit.

Reasons for this preference come down to things like better potential accuracy on the cast, ease of storage and handling, ease of fighting and landing fish, rod tip stays within the kayak, lower swing weights, better in tight quarters. What one might lose using a shorter rod is a little distance and ability to mend the line. In my experience, Texas sight casting for redfish is not a long distance type of fishing, especially from a kayak. Shots aren't out 80 or 90 feet. If you see a distant fish, you can typically outrun it in a kayak and then position yourself for the shot.

If you plan on wading primarily and use the kayak to get to some wade able spot and then get out to wade, then a longer rod might be the way to go. Otherwise, I believe a longer rod overall is a handicap versus a shorter model when stalking fish and casting from the kayak. I carry 3 fly rods typically in my Commander 140, all no longer than 7'6", out into the marsh or bays or rivers around Brazoria County. About 90% of the water I fish it is impossible to wade. I never wish I had a 9' rod with me.

When I fish from my friend's boat, I carry the shorter rods. Short rods are just less in the way and easier to cast with all his bait casting set ups lining the Center Console. If I'm wading much above calve deep, then that's when I like a nine foot model.
User avatar
By JMS
#2255831
karstopo wrote:Having fished both 9' foot and shorter rods in the kayak for redfish, I'm a big fan of 8' or less rods when fly fishing from the kayak whether I stand, I do this mostly, or sit.

Reasons for this preference come down to things like better potential accuracy on the cast, ease of storage and handling, ease of fighting and landing fish, rod tip stays within the kayak, lower swing weights, better in tight quarters. What one might lose using a shorter rod is a little distance and ability to mend the line. In my experience, Texas sight casting for redfish is not a long distance type of fishing, especially from a kayak. Shots aren't out 80 or 90 feet. If you see a distant fish, you can typically outrun it in a kayak and then position yourself for the shot.

If you plan on wading primarily and use the kayak to get to some wade able spot and then get out to wade, then a longer rod might be the way to go. Otherwise, I believe a longer rod overall is a handicap versus a shorter model when stalking fish and casting from the kayak. I carry 3 fly rods typically in my Commander 140, all no longer than 7'6", out into the marsh or bays or rivers around Brazoria County. About 90% of the water I fish it is impossible to wade. I never wish I had a 9' rod with me.

When I fish from my friend's boat, I carry the shorter rods. Short rods are just less in the way and easier to cast with all his bait casting set ups lining the Center Console. If I'm wading much above calve deep, then that's when I like a nine foot model.

Great information, thank you for sharing, I'll primarily fish Port A & Aransas Pass area so I usually sit in my kayak to fish usually bottom is to soft to wade....I think you sold me, maybe not a predator but certainly a shorter rod, thanks again


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By karstopo
#2255834
None of this is life or death (except for maybe the fish) or make or break kind of stuff. I'm swinging more and more to the idea that one doesn't need anything fancy or expensive out in the Texas inshore scene.

I've heard nothing but good stuff about Redington rods. A 9' rod isn't going to make you miserable, I just have enjoyed shorter rods more.

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By Kayak Kid
#2255837
I concur with what Karstopo said about short rods. Yet, we are still talking about personal preference. It has taken me...,more years and more hours slapping water with a fly line than I remember..., to gain what little knowledge I have about fly fishing. You keep fishing and your questions will be more definitively answered as you gain experience.

Personally, I never met a fly rod, long or short, that I didn't love to fish with. Enjoy it all, and don't sweat the small stuff.

For technical questions concerning rods, reels, and lines, My suggestion is to ask Ron Mc. He really knows his fly fishing stuff. And, he's still young enough to remember it.
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By eightweight
#2256189
Kayak Kid wrote:Personally, I never met a fly rod, long or short, that I didn't love to fish with. Enjoy it all, and don't sweat the small stuff.
.


Yes, what Kayak Kid said.

Personally, I fish a 9 foot, 8 weight during the Spring and Summer, then 9 foot, 9 weight in the Fall. Never had a problem with a 9 foot rod in my yak. Hadn't really thought about it. But I think I'd stick with a 9 foot rod, it's more versatile. With a 9 foot you can fish the flats and surf as well.

More important, I think, is the weight and type of the fly line. Shots at redfish from a yak are short and fast. I prefer a heavy, short front taper, often called a "redfish", "permit", or "tarpon" line. And I may overline the rod one weight, depending on how fast the rod is.
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By karstopo
#2256399
You can fish 7’6” and 8’ rods in the surf and wading a flat, it just gets a little harder with heavier patterns when the water gets into the thighs. I have fished my 7’6” Short Stix in the surf. Waist deep wade fishing in waves is a real chore with any fly rod, 9’ or less. It’s too deep for baskets, I don’t like those even in shallower water, so there has to be a good reason to fly fish in waist deep water like obvious fish or sign.

I mainly fish sighted fish , fish sign, and structure. Blind casting isn’t something I really do. In my experience, I can almost always move closer to each whether I’m wading, in a boat or a kayak. By moving closer and staying outside the spooking zone, I get to make more medium or short distance casts which offer a greater chance of being on target and a greater chance of making a good presentation and a greater chance of getting a solid hook set. It seems sort of backwards to me to make a difficult 80’ cast when you can wade or kayak over and make the 50’ one. Redfish don’t typically run off where you can’t catch up to them, at least not anywhere I fish.

Just because one initially spots a fish at 90 feet doesn’t mean that one has to immediately make the cast at least not here from what I’ve experienced. There’s almost always an opportunity to make a closer approach.
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By Ron Mc
#2256581
thanks for the vote of confidence, bro.

I fish mid-length, mid-line-weight glass rods in the hill country - 6'-8' 5/6-wt.
Can't think of a reason not to fish a 9' rod at the coast, but there's no reason to not fish a medium-length rod, either.
While you can get up better line speed with a longer rod with a stiff (fast) tip, I've noticed specifically with progressive rod tapers (tip a touch on the soft side), such as my Fishers, which are magic wands for accuracy, stiffer medium-length rods will cast every bit as far.
Image
I know of several cane rod guys who hunt down the old 7' 7-wt spin/fly combo cane rods and convert them to full-time fly rods specifically for redfish. I had one of these for awhile, finally broke down and sold it, but it was truly a line-blasting cannon. (I have one of these stashed away in original condition, and will get Rob Sherill to convert it for me one of these days.)
When you get to fast rods like TCR or RPLX, the length definitely adds distance, which you don't necessarily need for walking on redfish. I like the magic wand approach of a rod that accurately handles a short cast as well as a long one.

Advantage of mid-length rod in a kayak is it doesn't get in the way like a 9' rod can.
Also, if you're sitting in your kayak, you're probably going to be on top of that fish before you see him, and a shorter rod is much easier to handle and fish in close.

what system are you fishing?

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