TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


User avatar
By Salaqua
#2244948
Good morning Fly anglers. I kayak fish in the POC area. I have a couple of questions.

I have zero experience in fly fishing. I would like to get started and try it out.

I plan on using my kayak, how difficult or easy is it to use the kayak and fly fish? (I have an ATAK 140 so I stand, pole, etc. most of the time I am searching for reds.)

Also, being a new guy, I am wandering what would be a good mid level rod and reel. I plan on going to Roy's in the near future to try a number of the out but need some advice on a beginning point. I am not adverse to buying quality gear if it is worth the value but I would like to keep the rod to under $600. I would not say I am in a rush to get everything right now.

I appreciate any help. Thanks.
User avatar
By Kayak buddy
#2244955
I have an 8 wt orvis helios its a high end rod, but if you could put me on some fish ill show you how to fly cast, i tie flies as well. The ATAK should be fine. Some people bring large beach towells to lay over the kayak foot pegs to preven hang ups.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
By StrykerDM
#2244958
Look at TFO rods. Good quality and warranty. Get a good fly line. I like scientific anglers grand slam.

For reels, maybe you can find a sage 3000 series still on sale. They were selling the old models as they released a newer version. Get one that will work for an 8wt rod.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
User avatar
By karstopo
#2245019
I don't think it's too difficult to stalk reds in a kayak. I'm a big fan of standing in the kayak while stalking. I just think it Makes spotting fish exponentially easier than sitting in a low position. The sooner you See them, the more options you tend to have getting into position for the cast.

I'm going to cut against the grain and advocate for a rod like the G. Loomis 7'6" Short Stix. $400. Super accurate, swings light. Easier managing the fight and bringing the fish to hand than a 9' rod. The 8/9 weight might be a slight overkill, but it shoots a big chunk of line out in a hurry and can handle the wind.

But everyone works this out on their own terms. I find the shorter rods much more relatable and user friendly for spot and stalk fly fishing. I'm not worried about doing a lot of mending that a long rod might be better with when out in the marsh or bay. And I haven't come across a situation where I need a rod and line combo that makes a 100' cast. I have a pretty mediocre cast, but have no problem getting to 70' with comfortable effort using the short Stix and can squeeze more distance out with greater effort, but I seldom need to.
User avatar
By GoDoe
#2245244
Just one man's two cents. Go to Bass Pro and get a Dogwood Canyon kit in 8wt. It will get you on the water and will catch fish for about $120 total.

If you don't like fly fishing then sale the rod and get most of your money back. If you do like fly fishing this can become a backup or a loaner.

Finding fish is the hard part. Catching them is easy. If you can muck a fly to 30' you will be able to catch 90% of the reds you try for and they are pretty forgiving as to bad casts and ugly flies. They will tolerate just about anything except laying the fly line over the top of them.

Like kayaks, your first fly rod will not be your last if you like fly fishing.
User avatar
By karstopo
#2245250
GoDoe wrote:Just one man's two cents. Go to Bass Pro and get a Dogwood Canyon kit in 8wt. It will get you on the water and will catch fish for about $120 total.

If you don't like fly fishing then sale the rod and get most of your money back. If you do like fly fishing this can become a backup or a loaner.

Finding fish is the hard part. Catching them is easy. If you can muck a fly to 30' you will be able to catch 90% of the reds you try for and they are pretty forgiving as to bad casts and ugly flies. They will tolerate just about anything except laying the fly line over the top of them.

Like kayaks, your first fly rod will not be your last if you like fly fishing.


This is even better advice than what I gave. Redfish don't require fancy gear. I catch a bunch with my cheapo Cabelas CGRs. I agree, finding them is the hard part. And getting your act together to make the cast, that's a challenge at times, but a fancy rod won't help with that either.
User avatar
By Texjbq85
#2245268
I agree with what's been said. Don't overspend. Get a decently rated low cost starter combo. Cabelas, Bass Pro, TFO, Orvis, Redington ect. all have entry level combo rod and reels at varying prices on the lower end of things. With advances in materials and foreign manufacturing the difference in performance between low end to high end is not nearly as great as it used to be. Learning to cast and finding fish is 90% of the battle.
By hipshot
#2245301
I'll expand on what the others have said. You don't want to spend a fortune on gear that you don't yet have the experience and skill to appreciate yet. But neither do you want to buy junk.

Most of the inexpensive starter kits come with a cast reel and a bargain basement line. The rod you can work with, but the line will very likely lengthen the learning curve significantly. And a cast reel is very unlikely to survive in a salt water environment, no matter how conscientious you are abut rinsing it off immediately after every use.

If you purchase good (not top-end, but good) equipment initially you will learn faster and enjoy it more. There are quite a few viable rods for under $200, a ton of viable reels for under $200, and there are some decent lines for under $50. The Orvis Clearwater rods are around $200 and are a whole lot of rod for the money. An Orvis Hydros SLA reel (under $250) will provide a lifetime of great service. It will still be one of your "go-to" reels ten years from now. Check with an Orvis store for a package deal on a 7 or 8 weight package deal with the rod, reel, and a decent line.

TFO is another quality manufacturer with great rods for under $200, a BVK reel for about the same price as a Hydros, and they sell a very competitively priced line that is supposed to be pretty decent quality (sorry -- no personal experience with it myself).

If you buy gear of that quality and decide you don't like flinging feathers, it will be much easier to sell. And if you do like it (I'm betting you will), you'll have gear that won't end up sitting in the corner, forgotten as your skills develop. At least until you get to the point where you are buying $900 rods and $800 reels.........

And because some well-meaning person will invariably tell you that you "need a X weight rod for reds, and a X weight rod for specks, and a X weight rod for ??? fish, remember this: the rod (and matching line) weight is about what flies you are casting, and under what conditions you are casting. It's not about the size of the fish you are after. If there is no wind and you aren't throwing heavy, weighted flies, you can use a very light rod / line combo to catch those slot reds, but if you need to fight heavy winds or throw heavy flies in fast or deep water, you need a heavier setup. A 7 or 8 weight setup will let you throw heavier flies. A 2 or 3 weight won't handle heavy wind or heavy flies, but it will sure make catching slot reds a hoot when conditions permit. I use a half weight and a two weight for reds when conditions permit. I often have to step up to a seven or an eight weight, and even once in a while a ten, when conditions dictate.

If you can, have someone with fly fishing experience help you select your gear. You won't regret taking up the fly rod. Good luck!
By Scottybdiving
#2247448
Salaqua, I'm only a few years ahead of you on the fly fishing and I'm brand new to kayak fishing. I agree with what everyone is saying about getting a base setup to start. The only thing I can add is; go out with a professional guide a few times. They will help you streamline the process and teach you valuable information like patterns, and tieing leaders and tippet. They will also show you what flys work for the area. I usually try to do one day of guided fishing at the beginning of each trip. I am going to the San Juan River in NM this month and I have a guided float trip scheduled the 1st day. After that, I am on my own, using the kayak to assist. I will fish from the kayak and also do a lot of wading.
TSL Grasswalker Review

Any of ya'll read Texas Saltwater fishing mag? Re[…]

Kayak Fishing Baffin Bay

Cool, thanks for the information! I spend a good […]

Setting the hook with a casting rod

Really good info from all above. I would actual[…]

Bob Hall Next Week Anyone?

anyone fishing this Friday or Saturday? I'm loo[…]