TexasKayakFisherman.com est. 2000

Kayak fishing the Lone Star State...


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By JW FunGuy
#2274818
Interesting. Like you I haven’t used a glass rod for a LONG time. But your reasons make sense, kind of makes me want to start pursuing Craigslist!
I did wonder about the shorter rod though. I have been thinking going longer than the 9ft I have just so I have more clearance sitting in the kayak especially in marshes with shore grass. ???
#2274825
JW FunGuy wrote:Interesting. Like you I haven’t used a glass rod for a LONG time. But your reasons make sense, kind of makes me want to start pursuing Craigslist!
I did wonder about the shorter rod though. I have been thinking going longer than the 9ft I have just so I have more clearance sitting in the kayak especially in marshes with shore grass. ???
I have an 8ft 6wt and a 7ft 4wt it's good to have the clearance

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By karstopo
#2274826
JW FunGuy wrote:Interesting. Like you I haven’t used a glass rod for a LONG time. But your reasons make sense, kind of makes me want to start pursuing Craigslist!
I did wonder about the shorter rod though. I have been thinking going longer than the 9ft I have just so I have more clearance sitting in the kayak especially in marshes with shore grass. ???


I fly fish out of a 14' Commander and mostly use 7'6" fly rods for that. I usually carry 2 7/8 weight fiberglass CGR rods and a 7'6" G. Loomis Short Stix. What's nice about the short rods and my kayak is that the rod tips do not extend past the bow when resting between my feet. When a fish I'm fighting swings under my bow from one side of the kayak to the other and under the kayak, a 7'6" rod is long enough to let it happen without running into problems, although I might have to extend my arms towards the bow some. A nine foot rod does extend beyond the tip of the bow and would cause problems with contacting cord grass or possibly get tangled while fighting the fish on another rod.

Fiberglass is really nice for the bigger fish that dives under the kayak and out the other side. Glass bends a lot more without snapping in two, at least compare to carbon fiber. Glass is really nice for short to medium distance odd angle shots at redfish, which are the typical type I encounter out in the marsh. I really only bring along the graphite rod to tame the wind.

But I fully believe there are a bunch of ways to approach fly fishing with the gear and rods and techniques. Up and down the coast the conditions vary so what might be good one place might not be good in another. There are many ways to skin this cat. I've mostly figured out how I like to go about it and am constantly tweaking things, but understand there are alternative approaches and ideas that work for others. Know there is no one path to enjoying and connecting with fish while fly fishing. Fly fishing has a ton of opportunities for customizing techniques, flies, gear, leaders, etc. and at this point the personal touch opportunities to add in seem about infinite.
#2274876
JW FunGuy wrote:Whew! You had me going there. I was about to say “Red’s on a 4wt!?” I guess I’ve got Salt on the brain!
Actually I know a guy who uses a 4wt in the bay for reds. I tied him a bunch of flies

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By Frreed
#2274881
He makes a couple good points about durability.

I a few glass rods that I love for trout fishing. Much of that has to do with shorter length, softer action and they just look and feel cool on the stream.

For the salt, glass has never done it for me. Weight is a big factor. Spending a day casting an 8' glass rod requires ice and bourbon therapy. The same day with a graphite rod only requires bourbon. Wind is always an issue at the coast. The speed of a graphite rod punches into that wind better than glass any day. I'll take issue with him about fighting bigger fish. Most rods used for saltwater are more flexible at the tip and really stout in the butt section. You can put more pressure on the fish and get a faster CPR without tiring the fish as much. Sure if it goes under the yak, glass may have an advantage, but not (for me) a reason to fish glass in salt. As for delicate presentation, it's all in the cast. Open that loop a bit and you will get barely a ripple with even the fastest graphite. Tighten that loop up and I can cast with more accuracy at longer distances with graphite.

I've got both, fish both and love both. Different tools for different tasks. M wife has never understood this...
#2274882
Frreed wrote:He makes a couple good points about durability.

I a few glass rods that I love for trout fishing. Much of that has to do with shorter length, softer action and they just look and feel cool on the stream.

For the salt, glass has never done it for me. Weight is a big factor. Spending a day casting an 8' glass rod requires ice and bourbon therapy. The same day with a graphite rod only requires bourbon. Wind is always an issue at the coast. The speed of a graphite rod punches into that wind better than glass any day. I'll take issue with him about fighting bigger fish. Most rods used for saltwater are more flexible at the tip and really stout in the butt section. You can put more pressure on the fish and get a faster CPR without tiring the fish as much. Sure if it goes under the yak, glass may have an advantage, but not (for me) a reason to fish glass in salt. As for delicate presentation, it's all in the cast. Open that loop a bit and you will get barely a ripple with even the fastest graphite. Tighten that loop up and I can cast with more accuracy at longer distances with graphite.

I've got both, fish both and love both. Different tools for different tasks. M wife has never understood this...
Noted

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I think hes addressing the type of fishing he does in his short kayak.

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