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 Post subject: Cooking Blacktip Shark
PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:35 pm 
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Location: League City, TX
Looking for cleaning, preparation & cooking methods for blacktip shark.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:46 pm 
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I usually keep em' if there in the 2'-3' range.. I don't keep anything over that... I gut em' immediately. I mean, hook em', reel em' in and take them right to the cutting board.. IMMEDIATELY.... I cut/fillet the meat inside-out (I don't make shark steaks), sprinkle on some Tony's... Wrap in saran wrap and drop in the cooler or fridge for about an hour... Then I grill it... mmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmm G-O-O-D.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:49 pm 
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Barnacle Bill wrote:
I usually keep em' if there in the 2'-3' range.. I don't keep anything over that... I gut em' immediately. I mean, hook em', reel em' in and take them right to the cutting board.. IMMEDIATELY.... I cut/fillet the meat inside-out (I don't make shark steaks), sprinkle on some Tony's... Wrap in saran wrap and drop in the cooler or fridge for about an hour... Then I grill it... mmmmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmm G-O-O-D.


Do you need to skin it? What is the consistency of the meat like? Does it freeze well?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 2:05 pm 

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I pull the guts and any blood out of it as soon as it hits the gaff. I immediately cut the tail almost off and cut the head most of the way off and put it on lots of ice. Once it is cold I saw them with a sawsall straight across about 1 1/2 inches thick- Take a fillet knife and fillet the skin off. Marinade it and grill- marinade just like you would pork is how I like it best. I usually only keep blacktips in the 70-90# range. Smaller and not very big steaks- larger and meat has different texture.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:33 pm 
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Make sure you bleed it real well as SOON as you catch it,and yes skin it unless you like chewing on sandpaper.Grill it,fry it,blacken it,broil it it's all good and it's a firm not tough or mooshy.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:34 pm 
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Key with all sharks is to gut them immediately. All sharks, rays, & skates do not have swim bladders. They maintain the bouyancey by secreting oil through their livers. Gutting them immediately is key, as it also cuts out the bacteria growth, and enzymes from their digestive system gettin into the meat. You don't necessarily have to filet them out, but by all means gut them. Bleeding helps some, but I can't say enough - gut them and they will taste so much better.


BTW, did I mention gut them and they will taste much better??? :wink:

My recipe: 1/2 inch filet or steak, salted w/ tony's. brush over olive oil & minced garlic & fresh crushed black pepper & mesquite grill....MMMMMMMM dat GOOOOOOOOOD stuff


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:41 pm 
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castnblast wrote:
Key with all sharks is to gut them immediately. All sharks, rays, & skates do not have swim bladders. They maintain the bouyancey by secreting oil through their livers. Gutting them immediately is key, as it also cuts out the bacteria growth, and enzymes from their digestive system gettin into the meat. You don't necessarily have to filet them out, but by all means gut them. Bleeding helps some, but I can't say enough - gut them and they will taste so much better.


BTW, did I mention gut them and they will taste much better??? :wink:

My recipe: 1/2 inch filet or steak, salted w/ tony's. brush over olive oil & minced garlic & fresh crushed black pepper & mesquite grill....MMMMMMMM dat GOOOOOOOOOD stuff



Exactly.. I don't bleed them.. I gut them immediately... I wouldn't want someone cutting my leg off and letting me lay there bleeding out so I don't do it to fish.. LOL... Quick kill and gut em' and fillet them out......


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:47 pm 
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Same thing if you gut them they still bleed.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:58 pm 
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There was an interesting post on 2cool about sashimi and fish prep.

I read a little of it. Very detailed.

It mentioned to put the fish immediatly into salty/icy water to sort of daze it. While the heart is still beating cut the main artery between the gill and throat area and bleed out. Remove inners and put back into salty water in swimming position for up to 3-days. In the sushi world fish is at it's best and declines after 3-days.

Also said to the effect that shark have ureia in their blood.

Never introduce fresh water to raw meat. Also mentioned leaving the scaled skin on and bones intact if you freeze.

I have not verified and it sounds interesting you want to take the time to read.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 5:01 pm 
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Location: League City, TX
Thanks for the info. Gonna give it a shot on my next two-three footer.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 5:41 pm 
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I have never kept shark but from what i heard yu to bleed them as soon as you catch them and a little tip from a guy that I know he says to put the filets in cold icy water and let it sit in the water and the cold water help to draw out any ammonia that is left in the meat otherwise it will have a nasty taste and smell when cooked


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 6:01 pm 
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I wont get into the gutting vs bleeding debate, but I fillet them after I bleed them ASAP. *Note... this will dull a fillet knife quick quick fast, so carry a sharpener with you if you do hope to keep a fish to eat. I rinse the fillets, and put them beneath ice in the cooler with the drain unplugged and hung off the tailgate. This allows the ice to slowly melt and leach through the meat. Seems to elliminats a bit of the amonia smell. Whatever you decide to do, do it quickly. An important note to the fillets is the 24" minimum size requirement on all sharks. I usually keep a fish in the 3.5 - 4' range so there is no doubt as to their legality.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2008 6:14 pm 
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Bacon wrapped with peppers inside on skewers. Shark meat was maranated in Pineapple and Lemon Juice for several hours. Meat was dunked in Soy Sauce before wrapping. Cook untill bacon is crispy. Serve with avacado and salsa. Only keep what you can eat.
Image

Image


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 10:53 am 

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Location: Tomball, TX
WOW that looks good!!! Your not right for posting pics like that!!! my lap Top has drowl all over it!


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 Post subject: recipe
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 1:18 pm 
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Location: Magnolia, TX
That pic does look good.

Recipe:
Gut Shark ASAP
Fillet or Steak ( remove skin) and put on ice.
Marinate in Italian dressing with a touch of Balsamic Vinager
Smoke the meat with Misquite or pecan wood for great flavor.
Serve with fresh cole slaw or cajun tater salad and enjoy.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 1:24 pm 
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Izzy, that little concoction looks delicious! Definately on my list to cook up when the right one comes to shore.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 1:53 pm 
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Baja Fish Tacos w/ Chipolte sauce

Just substitute the shark for the snapper.

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/4 ... 6548.shtml


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2008 2:41 pm 
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castnblast wrote:
Key with all sharks is to gut them immediately. All sharks, rays, & skates do not have swim bladders. They maintain the bouyancey by secreting oil through their livers. Gutting them immediately is key, as it also cuts out the bacteria growth, and enzymes from their digestive system gettin into the meat. You don't necessarily have to filet them out, but by all means gut them. Bleeding helps some, but I can't say enough - gut them and they will taste so much better.


BTW, did I mention gut them and they will taste much better??? :wink:

My recipe: 1/2 inch filet or steak, salted w/ tony's. brush over olive oil & minced garlic & fresh crushed black pepper & mesquite grill....MMMMMMMM dat GOOOOOOOOOD stuff


What he said but with one difference. Sometimes if you fight them so long they already smell when you bring them in and then it won'tmatter what you do with it as it will be really strong smelling. Just like those Atlantic Sharpnose sharks on the headboats.
The best thing to do is bring one in as fast as possible and if you decide to eat it, make sure it doesn't already smell of strong urea then gut it immediately and take out what is that dark kidney area near what would be their backbone(if they had one :) ). Castnblast's recipe is how we do it. Just cook until it is tender and it is really good by itself or in fish tacos, fajitas etc.

I have also had it fried and in ceviche and it works well that way too!


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 Post subject: Re: Cooking Blacktip Shark
PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2009 6:50 pm 

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We just returned from catching some Atlantic sharpnose shark. They were not gutted until we returned to the dock. They were at laest 56 hours old before they were cleaned.Any ideas on how to perpare them?


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 Post subject: Re: Cooking Blacktip Shark
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2009 8:46 am 
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Rshelton wrote:
We just returned from catching some Atlantic sharpnose shark. They were not gutted until we returned to the dock. They were at laest 56 hours old before they were cleaned.Any ideas on how to perpare them?


If they smell like ammonia, throw them away because they're unfit to eat.


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 Post subject: Cleaning and cooking shark
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2009 9:59 am 
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Location: Anegada (Caribbean - N18°44.683' W64°24.133') and Clear Lake City (Houston area)
Blacktip, bull, and lemon shark are part of our regular diet on Anegada. We have cleaned and eaten more of them than I can count. As far as meat quality: blacktip ranks #1, followed closely by bull, with lemon lagging pretty far behind.

The handling of the shark right after the catch is very important. Sharks do not urinate. Instead, they excrete nitrogenous wastes as urea, which is stored in their in the blood, and the nitrogenous wastes are expelled trough their skin. When a shark dies, the urea in their blood and flesh deteriorates into ammonia, which is why shark meat often tastes and smells of ammonia.

When I said lemon sharks lag pretty far behind, it is because they seem to have much higher content of urea (and, personally, I think that is why their skin has a yellowish color). They are misnamed, should be called piss sharks. Even so, I clean and process them so that they are perfectly edible.

Anyway, after landing a shark, I cut the tail off as soon as possible so that the fish will pump out as much blood as possible.

As soon as possible after that (meaning when I can safely handle without being bitten), I beach-clean them by cutting away the head and belly. To beach-clean, I take the tip of my boning knife and make a puncture in the center of the head, ahead of the gills, with the knife sideways so that the blade is facing one side or the other. The correct spot for the puncture is where the harder part of the head sort of softens - I feel for the spot with my hand. From the puncture, I continue the cut to one side, angling back across the top of the gills, then down just behind the gills toward the pectoral fins. It is easy to detect when the cut enters the abdominal area - the flesh surrounding it is quite thin. As I enter the abdominal area, I try to avoid cutting much deeper than the belly flesh so that I don't puncture the internal organs. It won't hurt the finished meat if I do - it just makes a bigger mess to clean up. As I am cutting into the belly flesh, I angle the cut toward the rear above the pectoral fins and continue the cut along the side, above the pelvic fins straight back to the end of the abdominal cavity, coming to the shark's centerline behind the vent and ahead of the anal fin.

I then go back to the head, where I made the puncture, and cut away the other side in the same way. When this is done, the head, belly, and organs come away in one big piece leaving the keeper piece - the upper rear torso with flesh and skin. I often ice or freeze the torso and fillet it out later.

I have found that if I don't remove the flesh from the abdomen quickly, the flesh might have an ammonia-like smell. Even if I do beach-clean a lemon shark quickly, they still have the smell. If blacktips and bulls have the odor, it is much weaker than a lemon, and many times not present at all.

I keep a sharp knife that is dedicated for this - a 6 inch boning knife seems to be the best tool. Shark skin is hell on a blade, so I sharpen my knife after each cleaning session.

Filleting is pretty much straight-forward, except that there are no bones to guide the fillet knife. I start by making the cut along the cartilage from the belly side (no backbone in a shark), cutting toward the top centerline, front-to-rear. I continue cutting the first side all the way to the rear, not cutting through the skin at the top of the body, and slicing just outside the tissue that connects the fins to the flesh. I use my boning knife on the bottom skin from behind the area where the abdomen was cut away to the rear - I don't like my fillet knife to get into shark skin.

When the cut is completed, I open the body (like butterflying a shrimp). It unfolds into two halves - one which still has the fins and one that does not. I take my boning knife and make a cut right down the skin at the top to separate the two halves. The cleaning table that I use has a top made of 2x4's with gaps between them - very handy because I can lay the shark body on top aligned with the gaps and cut with boning knife down the gap. I then remove the fins from the other half with the boning knife.

Now I have two halves with skin on, one with cartilage, one without. I use my fillet knife to remove the cartilage from the second half.

Next, I use my fillet knife to trim away the abdominal lining on the front part of the two halves. It is the thin, whitish layer of skin on the front part of the insides of the two halves.

From here, finishing is simple. I cut away the flesh from the skin, starting at the tail. I try to take care to make the cut just thick enough that the blood line is left with the skin, not with the meat (remember that urea!). As I am filleting away the flesh, I generally stop the cut every 3 or 4 inches and slice off that piece of fillet. If there is much blood line in the fillet chunk, I trim it off.

Now I have clean fillets.

But not necessarily ready to cook.

If the flesh has any odor to it (or sometimes even if not), I cleanse the fillets of urea by soaking them in a bath of milk and lime juice. Yes, the lime juice curdles the milk, but it works. We usually have an abundance of limes on the island - key limes, actually - trees abound. If we could get buttermilk in the islands, I would probably give it a try. To soak the fillets, I put them in a large baking pan, cover them with the milk mixture, then cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for about 6 hours.

If the fillets do not have any detectable odor, I will still soak them in fresh water for 4 to 6 hours (covered in the refrigerator).

After soaking, I give them a rinse with fresh water, wrap and freeze.

When cleaned like this, these shark fillets are as good as any fish that I have ever tasted - snapper, mahi, whatever - shark is right there at the top - and is 100% boneless.

Cooking:

We cook shark just about every way that we cook any other fish in the states. My favorite ways are shark fingers and shark tacos, but we also bake, broil, and fry the fillets.

I had killer sharkburger for lunch one day last week - cut a fillet into thin slices, pan fried, and put on a bun with mayo, lettuce, tomato, onion, and a hit of hot sauce....


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 Post subject: Re: Cooking Blacktip Shark
PostPosted: Sun May 05, 2013 4:28 pm 
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Good info. I caught a 47" blacktip last week and we're eating it for supper tonight. I'm excited.


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 Post subject: Re: Cooking Blacktip Shark
PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 12:04 am 
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You hit the nail on the head WALKER, I learned about their prehistoric circulatory system in comparative anatomy.

The key is you have to cut off the tail while it is alive and let its heart pump out the blood. Same goes for skate. If you have ever had shark or skate that was not bled you will have a hard time eating it again.


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 Post subject: Re: Cooking Blacktip Shark
PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 12:32 am 
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X2 on milk and lime or lemon soak... Does wonders on shark as well as all fishy tastes... I usually fry thin strips with Louisiana Fish fry in peanut oil after soaking for a few hours.


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 Post subject: Re: Cooking Blacktip Shark
PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 2:37 pm 

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FYI, shark added to consumption advisory...

http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/WorkArea/linkit.aspx?LinkIdentifier=id&ItemID=8589976911


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