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By Prof. Salt
#2311177
Also stop in at Roy's and talk to the guys at the fly fishing counter. They have a lot of experience and are truly helpful. They also do classes once in a while to help you develop the casting skills and minimize bad habits.
User avatar
By TrailChaser
#2311203
Sea Striker Jingo wrote:Could anyone maybe supply me with a pdf or pic. Guide explaining how to cast how to work etc. Sounds sad but I am completely new to for fishing



I really suggest joining a fly fishing club and finding a member who's nice enough to get you casting right, right from the start. The worst thing you can do is learn wrong, then have to break bad habits to learn the correct way. Like using your wrist instead of your arm. I definitely recommend watching a bunch of youtube videos to familiarize yourself. If you do plan on learning on your own, record yourself casting so you can hopefully see what you're doing wrong and correct it.(like creeping backcast, and not stopping at the end of your casts)

Check out Lefty Kreh's tutorials.. Best salt water instructor you can find. (RIP)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57Ux1pq ... WCiFMgFI_y
#2311219
ben_beyer wrote:Here's a playlist I have on my YouTube. I got lessonsat BPS years ago and used YouTube tutorials when I got a fly rod 4 years ago. I would recommend seeing if any shops near you have beginner casting lesson days and go. I know FTU has them on occassion.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=P ... YYYIoVDYSf
Thanks

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#2311221
TrailChaser wrote:
Sea Striker Jingo wrote:Could anyone maybe supply me with a pdf or pic. Guide explaining how to cast how to work etc. Sounds sad but I am completely new to for fishing



I really suggest joining a fly fishing club and finding a member who's nice enough to get you casting right, right from the start. The worst thing you can do is learn wrong, then have to break bad habits to learn the correct way. Like using your wrist instead of your arm. I definitely recommend watching a bunch of youtube videos to familiarize yourself. If you do plan on learning on your own, record yourself casting so you can hopefully see what you're doing wrong and correct it.(like creeping backcast, and not stopping at the end of your casts)

Check out Lefty Kreh's tutorials.. Best salt water instructor you can find. (RIP)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57Ux1pq ... WCiFMgFI_y
Thanks. Rip:(

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
User avatar
By 2 Weight Willie
#2311227
Prof. Salt wrote:With winds laying all morning, I took the opportunity to get out the 2 weight fly rod and play with a few reds. I had to tie a very light fly crab, but it worked well. I found a cruising school along the shoreline and got set up for a shot. The fly landed just ahead of the school and within half a second the line came tight. After a couple of minutes of wrangling the fish with the very light rod, twenty six inches of redfish slid into the net- Nice! I ended up losing the crab so I switched to the 6 weight and caught one more 23" red and a 17" trout to round out the catch. Not a bad stroll in the flats this morning!
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What rod and reel do you use

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By Ron Mc
#2311259
a rod that would be totally nebulous and inappropriate for a beginner.
You could only learn bad habits trying to cast without the feedback of line weight, and any fish you caught would abuse them.
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By Prof. Salt
#2311274
Ron Mc wrote:a rod that would be totally nebulous and inappropriate for a beginner.
You could only learn bad habits trying to cast without the feedback of line weight, and any fish you caught would abuse them.


^^^This. To use a 2 weight like this you have to have developed the timing and understanding of what the fly is doing as you cast, by using a more traditional fly rod for a while. Start with a 6 or 8 weight 9' long to give you good feedback and sensations that help you know how the cast is unfolding, and confidence once you hook a fish that you can land it. The little 6' 2wt rod I was using is designed for white bass and perch, but I get a kick out of playing with it for larger fish. It is capable of landing big fish, but it's tricky making it all work.
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By Ron Mc
#2311280
Glenn, I took a gang of 6' venerable glass rods - 6-wts - to a GRTU meeting where then 12-y-o Tyler Befus was the guest speaker.
Every kid that picked up the rods was casting with minimal instruction.
When I sold one to my friend for his grandson, first try ever, the young man was casting 50' in the parking lot (he was a Good friend, it was 6' Wulff rod below).

Mid-length, mid-weight glass has a lot of advantages, and one of them is sitting in a kayak getting off exceptionally quick presentations to redfish. This stuff was the highest tech in the 70s, with specific tapers worked out by masters like Bill Phillipson.
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There is a hierarchy of MOC vs. line weight and rod length, that everyone tunes to their preferences, and every 9' rod should be graphite, but 8' cane and 7' glass are also exceptionally balanced and the 100 and 50 years they've respectively been fishing is no accident.

This is a one-piece 6' 6-wt made from a Lee Wulff Conolon blank - a buddy found a crate of 6' and 7' old stock blanks.
(same rod you see videos of Lee Wulff landing salmon)
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I got a 7' one piece also - if I can get it away from my daughter.
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User avatar
By Prof. Salt
#2311287
Good to know! I think I'll start watching for used glass rods. My wife would say I don't need more rods, but as a fisherman more is always nice especially if it helps with delivering quick casts.
User avatar
By Ron Mc
#2311299
Some venerable glass rods that are do-not-pass-go.
Note that rods got better around 1962 with the introduction of anisotropic (linear fiber) glass pre-pregs (Scotchply), and linear S-glass fibers following.
Johnson Profile 400 rods made by Phillipson were the first to use this process (the lower Profile grades didn't)

Phillipson, which includes Orvis Golden Eagle and Fullflex, and some LL Bean (the remaining Bean rods are also desirable Lami and St. Croix) -
- all perfect progressive tapers, which have you working line without trying to get it started, and improves your accuracy.
If you happen across a Royal Wand, these were blanks Bill hand-selected for their light weight and crisp action.

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Fisher, which includes Scientific Anglers System (especially System 5 and 6)
- among the lightest-in-hand glass ever, and crisp action.

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If you happen to run across Fisher graphite, GT40, etc. also wonderful progressive tapers, though not as light in hand as newer graphites.
This is a Fisher Natural (unsanded) 2-pc 8-wt, and a magic wand for quick and accurate presentation.
Always like to use this example of the 2nd cast of the morning in Allyn's Lake - first cast was a bigger spec that tore the hook out on her second run.
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Last edited by Ron Mc on Fri Oct 16, 2020 10:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
By ben_beyer
#2311308
Prof. Salt wrote:Good to know! I think I'll start watching for used glass rods. My wife would say I don't need more rods, but as a fisherman more is always nice especially if it helps with delivering quick casts.


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