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By karstopo
#2287401
Interesting, thanks for the compilation.

The whole idea of being rescued or needing to be rescued is so mortifying to me as to keep me on my “be prepared” toes. “Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall“ Proverbs 16:18, certainly rings true, however, I’d just soon not be in that unenviable position of needing a rescue.
By SWFinatic
#2287408
Great work Neumie. Thank you for making that.

On the Lake Pflugerville case it's still early and I don't know the details other than she was swept into deep water by the high winds from a storm. There could've been other factors for sure. I don't live too far from that lake and it was no secret there was a storm coming that evening. The lighting show that came with the approaching storm could be seen for at least 30 minutes before the storm hit. The lake is small and there is no point on that lake where a kayaker can't reach a shoreline within 30 minutes unless there were other factors. There were winds with that storm recorded just a few miles away from that lake at 82 mph which is tornado strength. But it's all about education.

Hopefully creating this spreadsheet will help open up our minds to being safer and using better judgement.
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By Neumie
#2287412
SWFinatic wrote:Great work Neumie. Thank you for making that.

On the Lake Pflugerville case it's still early and I don't know the details other than she was swept into deep water by the high winds from a storm. There could've been other factors for sure. I don't live too far from that lake and it was no secret there was a storm coming that evening. The lighting show that came with the approaching storm could be seen for at least 30 minutes before the storm hit. The lake is small and there is no point on that lake where a kayaker can't reach a shoreline within 30 minutes unless there were other factors. There were winds with that storm recorded just a few miles away from that lake at 82 mph which is tornado strength. But it's all about education.

Hopefully creating this spreadsheet will help open up our minds to being safer and using better judgement.


I am constricted with the what weather data I can find from a historical aspect; Wunderground being the easiest. I'm not sure if there's a way to find what the forecast was for the day to compare it to the recorded data. I've had fronts blow through 5 hours earlier than forecast even though I would always check the morning of before heading out.

The only thing I find peculiar regarding the Pflugerville incident is that the kayak hasn't been found. It's not a very large lake (about 150 ish acres) and even if a kayak filled completely with water they still float even without added flotation.

I'm going to keep updating the list throughout the year and may add previous years as well over time. I find it interesting.
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By JW FunGuy
#2287414
Nice job! And very interesting.
I was watching that “Texas Law” program and one of the State Police/Game Warden guys said that in 10 years (I think it was 10 but might have been 20 ) and all the water rescues only 3 of the bodies recovered were wearing PFD’s. I wonder what the actual numbers are?
#2287418
probably no tethers either. if most could get back to the yak (by using tether) it would let them hang on for a rescue, but the wind blown yak is out of reach without a tether. Was there any data / information about use of tethers?
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By Neumie
#2287431
TroutSupport.com wrote:probably no tethers either. if most could get back to the yak (by using tether) it would let them hang on for a rescue, but the wind blown yak is out of reach without a tether. Was there any data / information about use of tethers?

Only one I read who had a tether to their kayak was a couple years ago. An incident on the Guadalupe River by the Gruene Crossing. Two kayakers were approaching the crossing when one fell off and got tangled in a strainer due to the tether. Second kayaker just watched idly by and did nothing. Luckily a group of experienced white water and trained swift water rescuers had just gotten off the river and were able to save him. After they saved the guy caught in the strainer the other guy, who did nothing, just casually mentioned "just another typical river trip for us", and they continued on their trip down river despite protests. Can't fix stupid.

I get being tethered to the kayak could be beneficial in case of rescue, as surfers and wind surfers are tethered. They can also cause more problems, especially if the angler doesn't have a knife to free themselves in case of entanglement.

It's hard enough to find a source to determine whether or not a PFD was worn, even less likely to know if a tether was worn as well.

jiggy-z wrote:Had one up Austin way.

https://spectrumlocalnews.com/tx/austin ... vere-storm

It's on my list, though I haven't marked the outcome until the body has officially be recovered or the search was called off.
By SWFinatic
#2287432
Neumie wrote:
SWFinatic wrote:Great work Neumie. Thank you for making that.

On the Lake Pflugerville case it's still early and I don't know the details other than she was swept into deep water by the high winds from a storm. There could've been other factors for sure. I don't live too far from that lake and it was no secret there was a storm coming that evening. The lighting show that came with the approaching storm could be seen for at least 30 minutes before the storm hit. The lake is small and there is no point on that lake where a kayaker can't reach a shoreline within 30 minutes unless there were other factors. There were winds with that storm recorded just a few miles away from that lake at 82 mph which is tornado strength. But it's all about education.

Hopefully creating this spreadsheet will help open up our minds to being safer and using better judgement.


I am constricted with the what weather data I can find from a historical aspect; Wunderground being the easiest. I'm not sure if there's a way to find what the forecast was for the day to compare it to the recorded data. I've had fronts blow through 5 hours earlier than forecast even though I would always check the morning of before heading out.

The only thing I find peculiar regarding the Pflugerville incident is that the kayak hasn't been found. It's not a very large lake (about 150 ish acres) and even if a kayak filled completely with water they still float even without added flotation.

I'm going to keep updating the list throughout the year and may add previous years as well over time. I find it interesting.


There might be a way to look up data on NWS website but I can't find it. I mentioned the wind speed as I saw that info on the Austin news unrelated to the story.

Not finding the kayak is strange no doubt. They do rent kayaks at the lake. Not sure if they have sit in's or on tops.
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By Neumie
#2287433
SWFinatic wrote:There might be a way to look up data on NWS website but I can't find it. I mentioned the wind speed as I saw that info on the Austin news unrelated to the story.

Not finding the kayak is strange no doubt. They do rent kayaks at the lake. Not sure if they have sit in's or on tops.

I tried using NWS. You have to submit a digital form and then it emails you a pdf. I couldn't understand it or I didn't see what I was looking for. I know some reports have listed higher winds, but for consistency across all the incidents I'm going to use Wunderground Historical data. It'll give me highs/lows along with wind speeds and directions.

If the incident happened on the coast I'll use the nearest NOAA gauge for wind speed, air & water temp. USGS river gauges for stream flow data if the incident happened on the river. TPWD's weekly fishing reports will list a small range for lake water temps for incidents on larger lakes.

It's not perfect, but it does a pretty good job relating what the weather was like for each day.
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By Neumie
#2287463
SWFinatic wrote:I did hear on the news that the kayak the lady was in on Lake Pflugerville was an "inflatable kayak". That explains why it hasn't been recovered.

Makes sense to not be able to find an inflatable.
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By JW FunGuy
#2287504
Neumie wrote:I get being tethered to the kayak could be beneficial in case of rescue, as surfers and wind surfers are tethered. They can also cause more problems, especially if the angler doesn't have a knife to free themselves in case of entanglement


I don’t think being tethered to your kayak is ever a good idea, especially in moving water. But for what we do I think you should have a bow line attached and coiled ready to grab if you find yourself swimming so your boat doesn’t get away from you. And/or someone can grab it to help get you and your boat to safety
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By Neumie
#2287777
Kalait wrote:Is there a safe way to tether to your yak while doing white water or rivers? I so keep a safety rope to throw to someone for assistance, this rope floats. :?:

I would never tether myself to my kayak in a river. A throw bag is your best bet.
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By Ron Mc
#2287807
there's also the threat of getting pinned between your boat and a rock. If there's a downward eddy on the rock, there's no way you can keep your head above water.
River power can forge an aluminum canoe around a rock like a Sherman bow-tie. A plastic kayak is not notably stiffer, and can do the same thing.
_______________________________________________

In big blows at the coast or lakes, people too often get separated from their boat with tragic consequences.
A paddle leash and hanging onto the paddle prevents it.

With a gale-force wind, your boat instantly windcocks beyond your control, and reaching waves instantly turtle you.
The way to avoid the windcock is ride out a gale with drift sock trolleyed to stern, here a short wall-cloud squall, with gusts hitting 35-kt. Two of us enjoyed riding it out.
The water depth here is only a few feet, which is lucky, because another buddy had just lifted his drift sock and turtled.
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#2287833
Neumie wrote:Since the Memorial Day incident I decided to research other incidents in which a death or rescue occurred in Texas when someone was paddling a watercraft. I compiled everything into a google doc to keep track. If you are aware of any other incidents to add to the list please let me know.

Google Doc link: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/ ... sp=sharing


Thanks for the info, do you mind if I share your report?
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