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By krfish
#2256330
I was in Academy picking up some artificials and some barrel swivels. There was another guy in the aisle sort of eyeing what I was picking off the shelves. He came up to me and said he was fairly new to saltwater fishing. I told him he was getting himself into a pretty addicting hobby and asked him how'd he primarily be fishing. He told me he had bought a used kayak and was starting to set it up. I told him that I'm by no means an expert but I told him that he didn't have to break the bank to get on that water. He was looking at some pricey rods and reels, and hey that's fine but he seemed a bit intimidated by it all. I told him to keep it simple, and pick up on new things while your on the water. He told me he felt pretty overwhelmed by the amount of info out there on Mono vs braid, spinning vs bait cast, etc. I gave him a few pointers and he went on his way. It really got me thinking. Have we over complicated things? I think fishing is all a matter of preference. As long as your safe and follow the laws set in place to protect the resource I really dont care how you go about it. I hate that people feel like they need top of the line every thing to get on the water. I have some nice equipment that I've bought over the years, but I dang sure didn't start out that way. In fact I've caught my largest fish on a $40 dollar academy combo. I guess what I'm saying through all my rambling is get out there and experience the wonderful resource we have been blessed with, and most importantly be safe.

KR


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By Fishtolive
#2256331
X2. Well put it and Couldn’t agree more.
I still have some old gears. They are not pretty but still functional.
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By Neumie
#2256350
Yup, I try to keep it simple as well. One of my favorite setups was a $15 6'0" Tournament Choice Rod with a $15 Quantum Optix spinning reel. I caught a lot of saltwater fish on that combo. When the reel crapped out I just tossed it out and bought a new one.
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By Drifting Yak
#2256397
krfish wrote: I guess what I'm saying through all my rambling is get out there and experience the wonderful resource we have been blessed with, and most importantly be safe.
KR


Well said there Mr. KR!
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By Ultrastealth
#2256402
I'm a minimalist. I see guys launching kayaks that look like the Battleship Texas, bristling with rods and tackle that would last me a lifetime of flogging the water. I take a small tackle box, a net, two rods, an anchor, my Gopro stuff, a small soft ice chest with drinks and a snack, pliers, my phone, PFD, and small emergency kit, a gallon ziplock with an extra mauler rig and leader, my stringer sometimes, my paddle, and my keys and wallet. I've been kayak fishing for over 20 years, and I've yet to come up short of something on the water. There was a time when I took more, but I've realized that it's not a week long trip up the Amazon, it's a few hours on the water then home.
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By TroutSupport.com
#2256410
You are spot on.. We go through phases ... in the beginning thinking we think we have to have this rod or this lure or what ever gear etc etc.. but as we grow and learn to locate fish then we begin to simplify gear and tackle.. we might get higher end equipment but at this point we know that it's not going to help us catch more fish, but we do it out of the experience and sometimes for the physical reduction of fishing with something lighter all day. I've simplified my lure box down to probably about 5 lures.. when I take someone with me I double that but it's the five same lures so I can make sure I can help them.. I only go into by big tackle box every other month as the conditions change. I reduce the gear in the boat to the bare minimum as well.

Good job.. nice post and a reminder to keep it simple
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By karstopo
#2256411
I see the folks taking a long time at the launch ( one spot I fish by the launch) , I mean like 20 and 30 plus minutes to load and unload all their gear and then place it carefully in the kayak. That’s totally cool if that’s your thing. People get on the water for different reasons. Some people like having all the comforts of home and lots of options and electronic gear. People are into different types of fishing and it’s really just what you relate to.

I’m always wanting to get going and get on the water ASAP so I try to have it where I can get everything aboard in one or two steps. Fly fishing makes it easy because I can get a whole lot of flies in one or two little boxes. Safety gear, a stake out stick, a little extra tippet, a couple of rods is about it. The people I fish with are of the same mindset even though they aren’t into fly fishing.
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By Coastal Country
#2256426
Neumie wrote:Yup, I try to keep it simple as well. One of my favorite setups was a $15 6'0" Tournament Choice Rod with a $15 Quantum Optix spinning reel. I caught a lot of saltwater fish on that combo. When the reel crapped out I just tossed it out and bought a new one.


And launching with Commodore Book made a seal team look slow as molasses

Stake out stick
Paddle
Milk crate with all tackle and rods on it
PFD
MAYBE an cooler

That was it, and I’ll be darn if we didn’t catch fish (Well Neumie did...)


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By TexasJim
#2256435
Yeah, I think Neumie always catches fish! (Go Josh!)

The thing that helped me get on the water quickly at the launch was making a bed extender, which let me carry my kayak right-side up(instead of upside-down on my truck cap), with almost all my gear in or on the kayak. Also, I bought a Gone Fishin' seat, which has five Plano boxes with all my tackle. I travel with the seat-back folded down, so my two rods and my landing net are over the seat, bungied down. When I get to the launch, I pull the kayak back far enough to stab my (training) wheels under the yak, roll it off and to the water's edge, lift the yak off the wheels, raise the seat-back, and all I have to do is stick the rods and net into rod holders, put on my PFD, lock the truck and I'm on the water. Five to seven minutes, tops. I probably took at least thirty minutes to get on the water before. More time on the water is good!

TexasJim
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By Yaklash
#2256439
For me, the quality or age of my gear has less to do with success on the water than it does with my comfort and effectiveness on the water. ANd I agree with the OPs point; get out there and keep it simple.

But hey, good gear doesn't suck. I certainly caught a ton of fish on my old Ambassadeaur 5500C with a Diawa rod that probably weighed 3 times what my newest rod weighs. It didn't hurt that I was using live bait most of the time, or that it was the late 70s and early 80s when there were a lot fewer anglers and a lot more fish (a lot more trout at least). Because once you know where and how to find the fish, the gear is merely a tool with which to catch them. It could be a $20 rig or it could be a $500 rig.

But there is a difference and it comes when you wade for 6-7 hours a day for three days in a row and every ounce lighter my rig is means the longer I can go without a break. Having a reel that is of high quality and well maintained means I can get 20 or more yards extra on every cast over a far lesser reel. That's more water covered per cast. And if you plan to catch some big fish on light line, you'll need a smooth, strong and durable drag system. That is pretty important and not really something that can be said for every cheapo reel.
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By Neumie
#2256466
Coastal Country wrote:And launching with Commodore Book made a seal team look slow as molasses

Stake out stick
Paddle
Milk crate with all tackle and rods on it
PFD
MAYBE an cooler

That was it, and I’ll be darn if we didn’t catch fish (Well Neumie did...)


My list looks like this:
  • Milk crate with three-rod rod holder and 360 light attachment
  • Starboard mounted anchor trolley
  • Rudder
  • High back seat
  • Paddle, stored on starboard paddle bungee
  • PFD w/ Whistle
  • Drift sock
  • Two stakeout poles: an eight footer for deep water anchoring & poling while standing and a 3.5 footer made from a $1 driver from Goodwill for shallow water anchoring & poling while sitting; both stored on port side
  • Handheld GPS
  • Waterproof Point & Shoot Camera
  • 5L dry bag for keys, wallet, cell phone, etc
  • Small First Aide Kit, stored in front hatch
  • Measuring stick
  • Landing Net
  • Forceps for hook removal
  • Stringer
  • Softplastics binder and two 3600 Plano boxes tossed in the crate
  • Two baitcasters and one spinning (occasionally a second spinning for a specialized technique)
  • Drinks and snacks tossed in the milk crate
My kayak has two pouches either side of the cockpit where I store my camera, forceps, a snack (typically sunflower seeds), and a bag of soft plastics I'm tossing for the day. PFD, net, drift sock, and stringer are stored around the milk crate in the tankwell. Measuring stick bungeed over the front hatch. GPS in the cup holder. Dry bag in the center hatch.

I pretty much have all four of my kayaks rigged the same way.
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By kickingback
#2256473
I'm the worst when I go out. But anyone that does go out with me is in great luck as I have so much that they can use all day/night and not put a dent in it. :lol:
But seriously, when I go out I usually like to go for long trips to maximize my trip potential since it's a 1.25 hr trip from home to shore. I want to stay out for 10 or more hours. I like to have 4 but no more than 6 rods set up for different styles/fish. I hate to stop and re-rig or tie lures especially since I mostly fish at night and I have to use 3X mag readers to see close items and tying lures slows me down. I swear I save at least an hour with rods rigged and ready.
With that being said, I use a trailer for my Hobie PA 14 and when I pull up I load it up and back it in the water in less than 15 minutes. I have loaded and launched faster than some boats that pull up. I am not worried about how long it takes me to launch. I take my time so I don't forget anything and make sure all safety items are ready and working.
but I do agree. Simple is best. Just wish my mind would understand and give me a break sometime... :D
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By krfish
#2256591
But hey, good gear doesn't suck. I certainly caught a ton of fish on my old Ambassadeaur 5500C with a Diawa rod that probably weighed 3 times what my newest rod weighs. It didn't hurt that I was using live bait most of the time, or that it was the late 70s and early 80s when there were a lot fewer anglers and a lot more fish (a lot more trout at least). Because once you know where and how to find the fish, the gear is merely a tool with which to catch them. It could be a $20 rig or it could be a $500 rig.

I most definitely agree sir! Good gear is great. I have switched over to lews with a lighter rod for the same reason. When your chunking a lure all day less fatigue is a good thing! I was just stating that the guy in academy seemed overwhelmed by the prices on the higher end reels. I said "hey man those are great, but you don't have to spend that much today to get yourself set up." I showed him some quality more budget friendly reels. I told him that over time he'd see what he likes/dislikes in a reel and that would be to his advantage when he upgrades. Some good stuff here. Hope you guys have a great week!



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By Ranch Hand
#2257413
When I started yak fishing 15 or so years ago, I was still using live shrimp and toting all kinds of crap around. Wading, I'd drag my shrimp bucket around, vest with tackle box loaded up and pockets loaded up, net hanging off the back of the vest, etc. Once I started trusting plastics life got easy, now I only use a wading belt with a fauxga and a few extra plastics already rigged and a topwater in a pouch. I never wear waders except during the colder parts of the winter. Simplicity is far better resist the urge to over equip.
By Kayak Kid
#2257426
When I was much younger, I had all the senses, but I had no cents. My one, least expensive on the market rod and level wind Shakespeare, along with a home made stringer was about the extent of my 'gear'.

Now that a whole bunch of wonderful years have past, I no longer have the senses, but, I've managed to acquire a few extra cents. I have no regrets about how I've lived, and my only fear of dying is that my wife will sell my accumulation of fishing equipment for what I told her I paid for it.

"Keep it simple, stupid, do the best you can, and have a ball out on the water".
Me.
By Tombo
#2257433
My opinion, the single most important piece to catching fish is what is in the water. Be it bait or artificial. The rest is for our convenience.
I prefer throwing artificial and getting up in age so I tend have lighter stuff.
The big difference in salt VS fresh water is corrosion.
Fish got to eat.
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By Drifting Yak
#2257459
Kayak Kid wrote:"When I was much younger, I had all the senses, but I had no cents.....Now that a whole bunch of wonderful years have past, I no longer have the senses, but, I've managed to acquire a few extra cents."

"I have no regrets about how I've lived....my only fear.....is that my wife will sell my accumulation of fishing equipment for what I told her I paid for it.". [/i]


Two great lines there Mr. Kayak Kid! Classic!

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