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By texnomad
#2254546
I have been using popping corks for 50 years and the newer models we have now really seem to me to work much better than those of yesteryear. Is anybody noticing any significant difference of performance between the many good models available these days? I fish mainly shallower waters less than five feet deep. The three models I have tried all seem to produce very well and I could not tell any performance difference in the catching. What is your experience?
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By kickingback
#2254571
I use the slim cigar popping cork as well like pocfishin. I find it works well in the lights and when you need a softer plop into the water after casting.
I don't think there is much difference in the bigger ones. You want some good clacking and sometimes the clack can be a deep clack or a higher pitched clack and I have found that that makes a difference as well.
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By Neumie
#2254587
I mainly throw the cigar shaped float, especially when throwing a DOA shrimp or in calm waters. I don't really need something with a lot of commotion, so it's my preferred choice. The concave popping is good for windy days. My favorite brand is the H&H TKO. It has a titanium wire so it's very hard to kink, weighted with two brass beads which make a nice click (similar to a fleeing shrimp), and comes in a good color selection (though I wish they'd make it in pink).

For live shrimp I like the Alameda style popping cork either from H&H or TTF.
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By texnomad
#2254605
I have had trouble in the wind with the larger corks doing funny maneuvers in the winds here around Rockport. The cigar shape seems to cast much better and more accurately in the winds and help catch just as many fish. That is what got me to wondering about the differences. The folks at Packery jetties seem to prefer the fatter and much more noisy corks. I guess it is different tools for different conditions.
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By TroutSupport.com
#2254623
Yes, it's different tool for different conditions. I tend to use the cigar shaped click cork the most due to casting and they are easier to work in the water. That said if there is a little chop from the wind and I'm targeting redfish I'll use a small cork with concave top. Reds love that kabloosh as it sound like another feeding redfish. Sometimes I'll use an oval cork for trout in higher winds and it has a similar effect in that it makes more noise over a cigar shaped cork.
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By redneckyakclub01
#2255259
Tombo gave me a cork about 8 or 9 years ago and I still use it. It's different than most in that it's got a weight suspended under it on a wire and a barrel swivel on top. Both the main line and the leader tie at the top of the cork. I have no idea of the brand as the color and writing have worn off long ago. The heavy, bottom mounted weight casts like a bullet and hook sets seem improved because I'm not setting "through" the cork.
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By TexasJim
#2255270
texnomad: In the latest Saltwater Angler, Capt. Chip Harmon had a feature on Woodie Corks, made by Phillips Tackle Co., in Crosby, TX. They have a Facebook page, but no website. One style has a stainless wire thru, the other has a mono line thru it. Some tackle stores have them, but I didn't see any near the Coastal Bend listed. I'd bet Tackle Town or Roy's will soon have them.
TexasJim
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By Ron Mc
#2255284
H&H makes their version of the Mansfield Mauler, a bit closer to the original, and Larry's has it - Tackle Town - I think I'll always call it Larry's, just like I'll always call the wire/cigar weightless cork a Mansfield Mauler.
Tackle Town also carries Hoagies - I couldn't believe the last time I was in Cabela's in San Antonio, there was not a single plastic shrimp tail.
One lure I've been fishing since the late 80s uses Stazo flex jigs, and a Hoagies rigged this way with a Stazo and treble behaves exactly like a shrimp evading with a tail kick (the cork click), then settling down and swimming with its legs.
Image
Add Procure shrimp gel to this and you may as well be fishing live bait.
Since we can't get flex-jigs any more, Shiney Hiney is a pre-rigged popping-cork+plastic shrimp that fishes Really Well.
My near-novice friend - old guy, fishing all his life and complaining he never caught a fish at the Coast in 30 years. But our October Rockport trip, he caught his first keeper red in the first half-hour, and out-fished everyone on the trip, fishing only the Shiney Hiney. He religiously applied Procure every 3rd cast, as I had first instructed, caught every fish with the lure at rest, and he even caught keeper reds trolling.

The original Mauler is unquestionably the best cork for fishing a "free" live bait on any length leader. Sitting in a kayak and fishing the Stazo rig above, though, the Mansfield Mauler cork is difficult to see (though very easy to see standing). Fishing the Shiney Hiney last fall, I noticed its yellow standard-shape popping cork is visible over a very great distance, even sitting in a kayak. I re-did the Stazo rig with a small yellow egg cork on mono I picked up at Larry's last fall. That solved the visibility problem - could see the lure forever.

Here's a Shiney Hiney rigged on this spinning rod.
Something else I noticed about Shiney Hiney was they drew strikes as soon as they hit the water.
Image

Somebody needs to make some more Stazo jig-heads - the patent has to be expired now.
I forget where I got these, but they're almost as good - a double-hook-rigged cocahoe hooks up short-striking specs really well.
Image
yes, already drifted off corks, but if you're fishing Trout Support, squeeze a little Procure in the hook slot.
Last fall I landed several specs that weren't hooked, but were squeezing the lure in their gullet and didn't want to let it go.
Once in hand they coughed it up, but they weren't hooked.
Image
Last edited by Ron Mc on Tue Feb 06, 2018 9:31 am, edited 5 times in total.
By Tombo
#2255285
In shallow water, try the cigar shaped corks, unweighted with your favorite plastic rigged worm style. I find it easier to throw this rig using a spinning outfit. For heavier popping cork rigs, I can throw using a conventional reel and rod.
On a side note, I do not think we ever met. Would love to talk fishing over a cup of coffee at the Taqueria next to Tackle Town.
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By Ron Mc
#2255293
For me, I'm always fishing a fly rod in the skinny water, and especially for sight-fishing.
I switch to bait rods for blind fishing, and especially drifting the kayak back home.

Coming from the hill country, salt trips are planned events - trying to get my buddies motivated for a Mar/Apr trip.
In the 90s when I was working contract, I fished every-other week with my guide buddy out of Lamar (when he didn't have a fare)
If your invitation is for me, I'll let you know if we have a spring trip planned. Can't have too many fishing friends.
By Ryanh1801
#2255297
texnomad wrote:I could not find woody corks for fishing with internet searching. Do you have a website to share with us.


Mike over at Fin Factory in CC has them. They are very well made.
#2255320
Ryanh1801 wrote:
texnomad wrote:I could not find woody corks for fishing with internet searching. Do you have a website to share with us.


Mike over at Fin Factory in CC has them. They are very well made.
Looks like Phillips tackle in Crosby may carry them but couldn't see how to order online. They only have a facebook page and I don't facebook. Maybe call them? And it's spelled "Woodies" which may help with online searches.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
By Tombo
#2255330
redneckyakclub01 wrote:Tombo gave me a cork about 8 or 9 years ago and I still use it. It's different than most in that it's got a weight suspended under it on a wire and a barrel swivel on top. Both the main line and the leader tie at the top of the cork. I have no idea of the brand as the color and writing have worn off long ago. The heavy, bottom mounted weight casts like a bullet and hook sets seem improved because I'm not setting "through" the cork.

It's called The Inticer. Don't know where you can buy them.
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By Duweezy
#2255341
You put me on those corks too Tom. They have them at Roy's bait and tackle.

Tombo wrote:
redneckyakclub01 wrote:Tombo gave me a cork about 8 or 9 years ago and I still use it. It's different than most in that it's got a weight suspended under it on a wire and a barrel swivel on top. Both the main line and the leader tie at the top of the cork. I have no idea of the brand as the color and writing have worn off long ago. The heavy, bottom mounted weight casts like a bullet and hook sets seem improved because I'm not setting "through" the cork.

It's called The Inticer. Don't know where you can buy them.
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By Neumie
#2255360
Ron Mc wrote:H&H makes their version of the Mansfield Mauler, a bit closer to the original, and Larry's has it - Tackle Town - I think I'll always call it Larry's, just like I'll always call the wire/cigar weightless cork a Mansfield Mauler.
Tackle Town also carries Hoagies - I couldn't believe the last time I was in Cabela's in San Antonio, there was not a single plastic shrimp tail.
One lure I've been fishing since the late 80s uses Stazo flex jigs, and a Hoagies rigged this way with a Stazo and treble behaves exactly like a shrimp evading with a tail kick (the cork click), then settling down and swimming with its legs.
Image

I still refer to slip cork rigs as Maulers too.

That's an interesting shrimp setup with the Stazo, never seen anything like that. A while back I started purchasing my DOA shrimp in the unrigged kits so I could rig them backwards under the cork. The shrimp will launch backwards when the rod is snapped and then subtly glides forward with the weight placed in the factory spot; works great.
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By Ron Mc
#2255396
Neumie wrote:That's an interesting shrimp setup with the Stazo, never seen anything like that. A while back I started purchasing my DOA shrimp in the unrigged kits so I could rig them backwards under the cork. The shrimp will launch backwards when the rod is snapped and then subtly glides forward with the weight placed in the factory spot; works great.

The rig was diagrammed on the Stazo Flex Jig package.
btw, I just looked up Jack Stazo's patent - it wasn't awarded until 2007, so it has 9 more years to run.
http://www.freepatentsonline.com/D539379.pdf
Searched our forum, and Texas Tackle Factory owns the patent
viewtopic.php?p=1407094#p1407094
They also own the patent and make Shiney Hiney.
I e-mailed TTF to find out about the jigheads...

larry long shadows wrote:i remember when people were putting a hook on the back end of the Mansfield mauler because trout were hitting the cork

Mansfield Mauler also sold them that way.
The idea works for rainbows, too - they'll often hit your "strike indicator" which is jargon for bobber.
For fishing a dropper fly in riffles and pocketwater, especially some favorite spots on the Guadalupe, I tie up a parachute dry on a Unibobber, and will split fish between the bobber and the dropper fly. (For the normal deeper-water strike indicator, Thingamabobber is the best by far.)

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