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By teen yaker
#2210712
alwaysstuck wrote:If you find a pair of pliers that you like (PLine as you said above) just take a dab of loc-tite put it on the screw and screw back in. That's an easy fix. I'm not saying there aren't better ones out there but my pair had he same problem and I did that, works great now.

A small bottle is like 5-10$ and I keep one around to use on different things. Easier than replacing whole items.


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That would for sure solve the problem with the side cutter screw's backing out. But the main problem I had with them was the frame bending and when you want to close the plier jaws, they would be over-lapping.
By teen yaker
#2210713
lagavulin62 wrote:I'm glad I don't have this problem. I purchased a pair of pliers from Lowes 10 years ago and all I use it for is fishing. It goes in my wade pocket and is submerged the whole time. It's quality but I paid no more than 12 dollars. A little surface rust but it doesn't affect functionality. What amazes me is I haven't lost it, unlike the number of scissors I have gone through. Yes I only use it for hook removal. I know it could cut through wire but doesn't work on fishing line.(and why should it, it's not made for fishing) I carry a small pair of scissors worth no more than 5 dollars for snipping line. So it's just a thought. Sometimes you just have to get creative and forget about all this "specialty" equipment. Just because something is made for fishing doesn't mean it's good for fishing.




I must be cursed with my gear always rusting :(


Although I don't agree with your last sentence (if it's made for fishing, it's gonna be good for it's specified purpose, but it'll cost a lot more), I do applaud that you've been able to keep cheap pliers from Lowes working for 10 years. My record is like 2 months...
User avatar
By Yaklash
#2210786
I am of the opinion that hook removal is all about finesse and leverage. Gripping and ripping with that brute strength is not so good for fish being released.

I use surgical grade stainless steel hemostats. Unfortunately, they aren't readily available to most of us. If you know a doctor, ask them to get you a pair of 6-1/2" straight hemostats. But they are not cheap. They will, however, last you 25 years with a fresh water rinse and a bit of WD-40 after each use. The hemostats they sell at Academy are not truly surgical grade stainless.

For me, there is no better hook removal tool. They can also handle the task of bending most hooks back into shape (tho not 2X or heavier). I can get a good grip on the hook, lock it down and then re-grip in a way that allows me to move the hook in the right direction, with the right pressure, to remove the hook and avoid tearing up the fish's mouth.

If you want to cut line, get a Boomerang.
User avatar
By Karyuu
#2210792
Yaklash wrote:I am of the opinion that hook removal is all about finesse and leverage. Gripping and ripping with that brute strength is not so good for fish being released.

I use surgical grade stainless steel hemostats. Unfortunately, they aren't readily available to most of us. If you know a doctor, ask them to get you a pair of 6-1/2" straight hemostats. But they are not cheap. They will, however, last you 25 years with a fresh water rinse and a bit of WD-40 after each use. The hemostats they sell at Academy are not truly surgical grade stainless.

For me, there is no better hook removal tool. They can also handle the task of bending most hooks back into shape (tho not 2X or heavier). I can get a good grip on the hook, lock it down and then re-grip in a way that allows me to move the hook in the right direction, with the right pressure, to remove the hook and avoid tearing up the fish's mouth.

If you want to cut line, get a Boomerang.


FYI harbor freight has a good pair of ~10" SS hemostats for cheap (3-6 bucks). They have been great.
User avatar
By kickingback
#2210807
I always carry and use these and have no issues with rust...I have them all on retractable bungees connected to each other with a small float in case they get tossed overboard.
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By teen yaker
#2210827
Yaklash wrote:I am of the opinion that hook removal is all about finesse and leverage. Gripping and ripping with that brute strength is not so good for fish being released.

I use surgical grade stainless steel hemostats. Unfortunately, they aren't readily available to most of us. If you know a doctor, ask them to get you a pair of 6-1/2" straight hemostats. But they are not cheap. They will, however, last you 25 years with a fresh water rinse and a bit of WD-40 after each use. The hemostats they sell at Academy are not truly surgical grade stainless.

For me, there is no better hook removal tool. They can also handle the task of bending most hooks back into shape (tho not 2X or heavier). I can get a good grip on the hook, lock it down and then re-grip in a way that allows me to move the hook in the right direction, with the right pressure, to remove the hook and avoid tearing up the fish's mouth.

If you want to cut line, get a Boomerang.




Do worry, I'm careful when unhooking fish (I'm not the type that just violently shakes the fish by the hook until it comes off) and if they swallow it, I'll cut the line and retrieve the hook through the gills. I have a boomerang that I bought on clearance at cabelas. They work great, I like them. I've yet to use them in saltwater, though.
By teen yaker
#2210832
Well, I went to academy last night and they had a lot of fishing stuff on sale, including the h2O brand aluminum pliers, they were $15 (regular $30), so I got them. They're a little bulky, but so far seem decent. They have some flex (I can push them side to side) but do seem a lot stronger than the adaros (which went up in price from $30 to $35). I'll do a review after my fishing trip this weekend on this thread.



Btw, anything on clearance, got an extra 25% off at the register. Man, I love academy.
User avatar
By TroutSupport.com
#2210835
Yaklash wrote:
I use surgical grade stainless steel hemostats. Unfortunately, they aren't readily available to most of us. If you know a doctor, ask them to get you a pair of 6-1/2" straight hemostats. But they are not cheap. They will, however, last you 25 years with a fresh water rinse and a bit of WD-40 after each use. The hemostats they sell at Academy are not truly surgical grade stainless.

For me, there is no better hook removal tool. They can also handle the task of bending most hooks back into shape (tho not 2X or heavier). I can get a good grip on the hook, lock it down and then re-grip in a way that allows me to move the hook in the right direction, with the right pressure, to remove the hook and avoid tearing up the fish's mouth.


Actually, there is a 'General Store' between Austin and Houston on 71.. looks like a hippy compound for living off the grid... but hey, they have those heavy duty Stainless hemostats with a 6-8 inch handle.. Those are the ones I used to use.. next time i'm that way I'll pick a couple up.
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By JimBeaux
#2210871
Yaklash wrote:I am of the opinion that hook removal is all about finesse and leverage. Gripping and ripping with that brute strength is not so good for fish being released.

I use surgical grade stainless steel hemostats. Unfortunately, they aren't readily available to most of us. If you know a doctor, ask them to get you a pair of 6-1/2" straight hemostats. But they are not cheap. They will, however, last you 25 years with a fresh water rinse and a bit of WD-40 after each use. The hemostats they sell at Academy are not truly surgical grade stainless.

For me, there is no better hook removal tool. They can also handle the task of bending most hooks back into shape (tho not 2X or heavier). I can get a good grip on the hook, lock it down and then re-grip in a way that allows me to move the hook in the right direction, with the right pressure, to remove the hook and avoid tearing up the fish's mouth.

If you want to cut line, get a Boomerang.


Yaklash

Youre right, hemostats are expensive (not too hard to find - ebay & amazon).

I bought 10" hemostats from Harbor Freight in Pearland 4-5 months ago....$5.95!! Curved on the end and have yet to rust. I really like em.
User avatar
By Crusader
#2210894
on a mission wrote:
Crusader wrote:I bought one for $8 about 2 years ago. No problems so far, cuts braid, metal "lips" can be replaced (I didn't have to so far -- and I fish more than most ppl on this forum), everything else is plastic.

They are $10 now:
http://penfishingrods.com/shop/product_ ... tem_id=154
Boom!^ And that's a bold statement as to fishing prowess. :wink:
According to my fishing log -- 75 trips since Jan 1 2016, 60 of them in first 4 months. How many ppl here can beat that? :wink:

The Angler wrote:
Crusader wrote:http://penfishingrods.com/shop/product_details.php?item_id=154
These look great! Can't beat that for ten bucks.
Just keep in mind -- they are made of plastic... If you try to pull nails out of wood board with it -- they will break. But on the bright side they float -- can't really lose them.
User avatar
By Yaklash
#2210991
TroutSupport.com wrote:
Yaklash wrote:
I use surgical grade stainless steel hemostats. Unfortunately, they aren't readily available to most of us. If you know a doctor, ask them to get you a pair of 6-1/2" straight hemostats. But they are not cheap. They will, however, last you 25 years with a fresh water rinse and a bit of WD-40 after each use. The hemostats they sell at Academy are not truly surgical grade stainless.

For me, there is no better hook removal tool. They can also handle the task of bending most hooks back into shape (tho not 2X or heavier). I can get a good grip on the hook, lock it down and then re-grip in a way that allows me to move the hook in the right direction, with the right pressure, to remove the hook and avoid tearing up the fish's mouth.


Actually, there is a 'General Store' between Austin and Houston on 71.. looks like a hippy compound for living off the grid... but hey, they have those heavy duty Stainless hemostats with a 6-8 inch handle.. Those are the ones I used to use.. next time i'm that way I'll pick a couple up.

I love that place, but I've never even thought to look for hemostats. My brother and I were looking more at gardening tools and supplies. Ask the grade of stainless and if it's not 316, don't waste your money. I doubt anything that costs $6 is 316, but if that is what Harbor Freight is selling 316 for, I'll buy 3 pairs.

The first pair I had lasted a long time with little more than a rinse and some WD-40 - they were given to me by a surgeon. Like I stated above, those sold at Academy (and I would assume other retail stores) are probably not 316. The second pair I had I got from Academy and they were crap. Started rusting on the teeth almost immediately and the hinge eventually got tight so I trashed them.
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By Cuervo Jones
#2210998
Just a heads up that the Non-general General Store on Hwy 71 (formerly Industrial Country Market) is only open weekend days now. They'll weren't doing good enough business to stay open weekdays. So go buy LOTS of foreceps!!!! I've got lots of great stuff from that place. You'll find all sorts of boxes, tools, and other swell items you never knew you needed until you get a load of the great prices.


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By habanerojooz
#2211001
Yaklash wrote:
TroutSupport.com wrote:
Yaklash wrote:
I use surgical grade stainless steel hemostats. Unfortunately, they aren't readily available to most of us. If you know a doctor, ask them to get you a pair of 6-1/2" straight hemostats. But they are not cheap. They will, however, last you 25 years with a fresh water rinse and a bit of WD-40 after each use. The hemostats they sell at Academy are not truly surgical grade stainless.

For me, there is no better hook removal tool. They can also handle the task of bending most hooks back into shape (tho not 2X or heavier). I can get a good grip on the hook, lock it down and then re-grip in a way that allows me to move the hook in the right direction, with the right pressure, to remove the hook and avoid tearing up the fish's mouth.


Actually, there is a 'General Store' between Austin and Houston on 71.. looks like a hippy compound for living off the grid... but hey, they have those heavy duty Stainless hemostats with a 6-8 inch handle.. Those are the ones I used to use.. next time i'm that way I'll pick a couple up.

I love that place, but I've never even thought to look for hemostats. My brother and I were looking more at gardening tools and supplies. Ask the grade of stainless and if it's not 316, don't waste your money. I doubt anything that costs $6 is 316, but if that is what Harbor Freight is selling 316 for, I'll buy 3 pairs.

The first pair I had lasted a long time with little more than a rinse and some WD-40 - they were given to me by a surgeon. Like I stated above, those sold at Academy (and I would assume other retail stores) are probably not 316. The second pair I had I got from Academy and they were crap. Started rusting on the teeth almost immediately and the hinge eventually got tight so I trashed them.


Good stuff. I did some research on 318 grade and found this interesting page: http://www.bosunsupplies.com/StainlessInfo2/

That page also mentions that 420 grade has the highest corrosion resistance, if it is fully hardened. I found a Medical supply place selling 420 grade stainless steel hemos: http://www.medshop.com/adc-crile-forceps-5-37.html
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By TroutSupport.com
#2211049
Yaklash wrote:The first pair I had lasted a long time with little more than a rinse and some WD-40 - they were given to me by a surgeon. Like I stated above, those sold at Academy (and I would assume other retail stores) are probably not 316. The second pair I had I got from Academy and they were crap. Started rusting on the teeth almost immediately and the hinge eventually got tight so I trashed them.


I had that very same pair... Mine held up though.. that is until I lost them in the bay some how. I think the fish gods didn't like me using them. LOL.

Habaneros... I think the one that Yaklash and I are talking about were 6 inches past the finger holes... mine were bigger and heavy duty. If one gets the smaller ones they bend too much and are too flexible..I can't believe they do surgery with that flimsy **** LOL with what we pay in medical cost it should be heavy duty ;-)

Cuervo and Yaklash.. yeah, that little store (Non General - General Store) is pretty cool.. just not open when we need it to be. Oh well, I'll have to plan a weekday trip.
By habanerojooz
#2211055
TroutSupport.com wrote:
Yaklash wrote:The first pair I had lasted a long time with little more than a rinse and some WD-40 - they were given to me by a surgeon. Like I stated above, those sold at Academy (and I would assume other retail stores) are probably not 316. The second pair I had I got from Academy and they were crap. Started rusting on the teeth almost immediately and the hinge eventually got tight so I trashed them.


I had that very same pair... Mine held up though.. that is until I lost them in the bay some how. I think the fish gods didn't like me using them. LOL.

Habaneros... I think the one that Yaklash and I are talking about were 6 inches past the finger holes... mine were bigger and heavy duty. If one gets the smaller ones they bend too much and are too flexible..I can't believe they do surgery with that flimsy **** LOL with what we pay in medical cost it should be heavy duty ;-)

Cuervo and Yaklash.. yeah, that little store (Non General - General Store) is pretty cool.. just not open when we need it to be. Oh well, I'll have to plan a weekday trip.


TroutSupport...yea, I thought that pair might be a bit flimsy. Perhaps you meant a pair more like these Rocheseter Forceps.

For the geeks, here's a tidbit I found on hemostat types. Perhaps a TKF member from the medical field could chime in and educate us these things. :)

....a general store that looks like hippies living off the grid, selling hemostats....that made me think of Oat Willie's :P Is this that eclectic place on Hwy 71 with all of he solar panels and stuff outside?
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By TroutSupport.com
#2211189
Store.. yes, that's it.

Hemostats. Closer.. The ones I used had very short heavy duty beaks. I guess the were forceps of some sort and not a hemostat. Next time I hit the NonGeneral General Store I'm going to pick up a couple more and I'll post some pics. I do sill like my Aluminum pliers though, but that longer reach still comes in handy.
By teen yaker
#2211261
Well, I got back from the fishing trip, which was a great success 8) . I was impressed with the pliers, they didn't bend near as much, if any, as the adaros or accurates. They cut braid, mono, flouro, and wire (I know, it's not meant to cut wire :roll: ) with little effort and no fraying for the braid; just a clean cut. Also, the side cutters haven't loosened at all, like the adaros did :x . I was able to easily get the hooks out of kingfish, cobia, snapper, spanish mackerel, etc with no problems :P . It's wierd when the off brand pliers work better than the name brands, and at a cheaper price :) .

All in all, I highly recommend getting the h2O aluminum pliers. If you're in the market for aluminum pliers, save yourself the fustration dealing with adaros :horse: and get the h2O pliers. They're a LOT better, a LOT stronger and are better quality. They're also cheaper. :clap: :clap:



The money I saved from not getting titanium pliers is going towards a new reel. :D



My only complaint with them is that the last half of the jaws don't close all the way, so I can't grip line or wire :| . I have to put the line at the base of the jaws to get a good hold, so I can tighten knots and do haywire twists. I think grinding the base of Jaws will fix that problem, though.
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By Ron Mc
#2297716
A thoughtful gift from your wife.
I'll add the KastKing Mad Bite pliers to the cost-effective Abel-clone list. The aluminum frames and mechanism are impervious to the salt. The hard-coated steel inserts have lasted me several years with the help of post-trip baths and Boeshield application.
They also make a set with a work-focused LED, which I gave as Christmas gifts to my dad and BIL.
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