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By pony_killer
#2167568
Wanted to hear some of your crazy/scary stories you had while fishing from your yaks or just fishing in general. I got nothing exciting besides getting hit behind my knee by a baby catfish in Rockport. Buddy of mine caught it and started dangling it around trying to shake it off his line and swung it to close to my leg. Felt like a hot dagger going through my leg. :oops: :lol:
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By MachewTexas
#2167779
Treble Hook deep in the neck.
I was re-entering the surf on a day that I shouldn't have gone out. It was one of those days where the waves were stacked up and crashing every which way... and too big. But I've only been yakking for a year, so I didn't know that I'm not that good.

I had the rod standing vertically in the crate behind me with my lure secured neatly right around mid rod (about level with my head). I was coming in backward very successfully and thought, why not try to ride all the way to the sand. Well, the wave speed up quite a bit around 2 feet of water, I lost control, the yak flipped, and I stood up. Them something pulled me off my feet and back under the water. I grabbed my neck and I was hooked! The rod was still in my yak, and it was floating away dragging me behind.

In a panic, I tried to rip the hook out two or three times (dumb move!), but apparently skin is very tough. Then the line, with the hook in my neck, pulled me under water again!!! I bit the line to be free. The yak landed on shore, and I was able to walk to a buddy.

With great force, and an increasingly light head and woozy stomach, I pushed the hook through. My skin stretched and stretched as the barbed hook slowly slid through my neck. He used my pliers to snap the hook in half, and I pulled it back out. As I passed out on a beach chair, they cleaned the wound with alcohol wipes and distilled water. I came to, and we drove to the ER for a tetanus shot.

Lessons learned: surf on calmer days, stow gear on re-entry. :monkey:
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By Jigawatt
#2167782
While fishing on a lake, I got hit by a micro burst from a thunderstorm. I saw the wall of wind coming across the water. I tried to make it toward shore but I was too far out. The wind hit me with such force that it pushed me over and pulled the kayak from me. Fortunately, the wind was angling toward the nearest shore and not out toward the main lake, otherwise I would have lost that kayak. I eventually recovered everything except a pair of crocs sandals.

Years ago, I was surf fishing off Galveston. It was one of those days when clear water made it all the way to the beach. I could see my feet in chest deep water. I baited up a surf rod and swam through the second gut to reach the third sand bar to cast. As I was tip-toeing up the back side of the third bar, a small black tip shark darted over the bar and swam into the second gut behind me. It looked to me like the shark was fleeing something, so I looked in the direction that it was coming from. Just off the third bar, the biggest bull shark I'd ever seen was slowly swimming over the bottom. I stood still in neck deep water and watched as this submarine of a fish swam by me and then out of sight. I did not make that swim to the third bar for the rest of the day, optioning instead to just cast into the second gut.
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By karstopo
#2167784
The ol' hook stuck somewhere in your skin is one "oh crap" moment I share. My version ( BTW, good job to think of biting through the line) involves no surf reentry or being attached at the neck to a vicious hook and then drug under by the mass of surf tumbled kayak and gear. That really does sound truly horrible.

All I have is a VMC size 2 treble on a Skitterwalk stuck past the barb in my left thumb with a still green slot red still attached. And that got my attention very quickly. First order of business I realized was stop the fish from moving because every wiggle and thrash was immediately and distinctly felt via my thumb. My solution was to pin the fish against my right side with right arm. Luckily, my pliers were handy right below me and I separated the hook from the split ring. Fish was attached to the other hook. Crisis over. Paddling was tough with hook stuck in my thumb, but I only had about 200 yards to the launch. I got my tetanus booster, antibiotic and hook removal accomplished at Options Urgent care in Lake Jackson.
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By Cuervo Jones
#2167804
I was fishing on Fayette lake on a cold, windy day and couldn't figure out why my 16' tarpon was handling so badly. It was rolling with the waves and getting to be non-responsive to my attempts to steer. Finally, a wave rolled it and dumped me and all my gear into the drink. Got most of it back and was fortunately in waist deep water. Hauled everything to shore and saw the cause...id neglected to put the drain plug back in after my last trip. Lesson most definitely learned! That was a COLD and LONG paddle back to the warmth of my truck.
By Yakety_Yak
#2167839
Not this past fall, but the one before, I was out at McFaddin with three friends (Cliff, Matt, and Dave). There were others out there but us three had camped out and were planning on hitting up the bull reds in the morning. We woke up to extremely calm waters and a beautiful sun rise. I was getting excited so I got everything together asap and on the water everyone went. Within the hour, what was calm like a lake went to crap. I even had to go back to shore to get my heavier anchor because the one I was currently using was dragging me along the bottom putting me far away from where I parked down the beach line. After going back to get my heavier anchor, I went back out. I anchored down and started to fish. Within a few minutes, I decided to see if this anchor was holding or if I was drifting again. Keep in mind the conditions now sucked. It wasn't unsafe but things just sucked in general. Huge swells but nobody felt that we needed to go in including myself. My only problem was (this was back when I first got my Santa Cruz Raptor) the anchor trolley was held to the yak with well nuts. The rear well nuts popped out and the next thing you know I started to take on water.

Immediately I pull up my anchor (I probably should of radio'ed into one of the other guys to grab my anchor) and headed back to shore. By the time I made it to the surf, my cockpit was even with the water!!! :shock: :shock: :shock: By the time I made it back to shore, my kayak was bottoming out to where I couldn't move it and I was afraid the current might take it back out to sea. The kayak was completely under the water. All you could see was the seat and the rods. Another person came to offer help of which I gladly accepted. We both pulled the yak ashore and everything was saved. When I was heading through the surf, that was my "Oh Crap" moment because I wasn't sure how much longer the yak would stay afloat. Even though there was a lot of water inside of the yak, the Raptor never felt unstable and did well going back through the surf. I was impressed!

The lesson learned for me was to not use well nuts on an anchor trolley. The only reason why I did that is because I didn't have access to the rear so well nuts was the only other option. Once I found the hatches to the pontoon back side, I had those installed and that gave me rear access (thanks to Rob for hooking me up with those hatches). Once I had access to both sides, I went with nuts and bolts and my problem was permanently solved.
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By txbrett
#2167896
It was a dark and dreary night....

Not really. It was a warm, sunny early spring day. I was fishing upper Trinity bay, Fort Anahuac to be exact. It was close to lunch time, and I was on my way back to my truck after covering a lot of water and catching NO fish. I paddled through a small cut into the Trinity River about 200 yards from where it enters into the bay. I decided just before I reached the mighty Trinity to stay tight to the bank after turning into the river, in order to keep from running over any power boats that may be in the area... So anyway, I made the turn and started heading toward the mouth of the river at a leisurely pace about 8ft from the bank. I was gliding happily along in a day dream when all of the sudden an explosion of debris (logs, salt grass, mud, etc.) and what sounded like a log truck going 60mph immediately to my starboard side woke me from my daze. I looked over in time to see what appeared to be a 35 foot (give or take...) Nile Crocodile (or American Alligator) launching from the river bank, coming directly at me. It hit the water with such force and violence that the wake/splash it created washed over the side of my Manta-Ray 14. I sat frozen for a second, just waiting to be in the midst of the death roll, but it never happened. I never saw the beast again. Like a wild man, I paddled back to my launch spot, leaving a rooster tail behing my kayak. Got out, loaded the kayak, discarded my soiled waders :shock: and headed home.
By Tombo
#2167898
Paddling with my friend, MT Stringer in the marsh I noticed my Hobie Adventure was acting different, kind of listing just a tad. When I opened the hatch I had about three inches of water in it. Pulled the kayak up a bank to examine the hull. Noticed the drain plug sticking out where I forgot to install day before. Stuck plug back in after draining the water and went back out. Again, same thing happened!! Water in the hull! Drained the water again and loaded up the kayak.
Went home and loaded up the kayak on some saw horses and started filling up the hull thinking I might have stripped the threads on the plug. Immediately noticed a drip of water coming from the front of the mirage drive well. Drained the water and discovered a crack.
Not only did I forget to install the plug, which I only took out once in two years, but also was taking on water through the crack in the hull.
Lesson learned was to pay attention to my "gut feeling" when something is not right.
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By karstopo
#2167902
My favorite is not about me and since he doesn't get on TKF, I think it's okay to tell as long as I don't reveal any names. During one of the October LSKS tournaments a few years ago this particular friend decided to hit a certain marsh that I had suggested might hold some fish. As the story goes he peddles his Hobie Into the marsh via a drain. He said it seemed a little unresponsive, but he just brushed it off to being out of shape. Up in a shallow marsh lake he sees a big pod of redfish smashing shrimp. Of course, he heads for the school, but makes almost no progress. Something seems to be holding his kayak in place. Meanwhile, the school of fish comes to him by then, but he can't manuever at all. He pedals, paddles furiously to keep up with the fish and the kayak will only creep along and won't turn at all. The water by checking with his paddle is surely more than deep enough, about a foot, so he pulls the mirage drive and nothing is out of place there. The Reds come back again and the whole sad comedy repeats itself. My friend trying desperately to get a fish. This time they come so close he can make out individual fish. He says it was a pod of winning fish with a couple of small ones in the mix. He pulls out a 20 incher. I'm not sure how long this all took. Redfish all around, but no way to get to them. Finally, he checks over his kayak again and notices a strange strap. He loosens this strap. It's his launch cart. The wheels had been digging in.
By Tombo
#2167918
karstopo wrote:My favorite is not about me and since he doesn't get on TKF, I think it's okay to tell as long as I don't reveal any names. During one of the October LSKS tournaments a few years ago this particular friend decided to hit a certain marsh that I had suggested might hold some fish. As the story goes he peddles his Hobie Into the marsh via a drain. He said it seemed a little unresponsive, but he just brushed it off to being out of shape. Up in a shallow marsh lake he sees a big pod of redfish smashing shrimp. Of course, he heads for the school, but makes almost no progress. Something seems to be holding his kayak in place. Meanwhile, the school of fish comes to him by then, but he can't manuever at all. He pedals, paddles furiously to keep up with the fish and the kayak will only creep along and won't turn at all. The water by checking with his paddle is surely more than deep enough, about a foot, so he pulls the mirage drive and nothing is out of place there. The Reds come back again and the whole sad comedy repeats itself. My friend trying desperately to get a fish. This time they come so close he can make out individual fish. He says it was a pod of winning fish with a couple of small ones in the mix. He pulls out a 20 incher. I'm not sure how long this all took. Redfish all around, but no way to get to them. Finally, he checks over his kayak again and notices a strange strap. He loosens this strap. It's his launch cart. The wheels had been digging in.

Classic, because I can relate.
By vstrom650
#2167968
Not a kayak story, but a fishing story involving my $600 power boat. Certain circumstances led to me purchase a Craigslist special and immediately put in on the water cause, if anything's going to happen, it's going to happen out there.

My son (14 at the time) and I decided to do some flounder gigging so we went out at night, found a convenient reef and parked the boat in about 6 inches of water. This was a small aluminum V-bottom, so I didn't worry too much about it scrapping the bottom as long as it didn't float off. We hopped out and begin walking around with a lantern and gigs. As we're walking, I slowly became aware that the tide was going out, but didn't really put things together real fast. A little later, I commented to the son that "boy, that tide's really going out fast" and still didn't think too much about it. Finally, I snapped and said "THE TIDE'S GOING OUT". We ran back to the boat and found it high and dry, with about 20 foot of sand and shell before getting to the water's edge. And that 20 foot was increasing by the minute. We sure didn't want to spend all night out there, so we grabbed the rear end of the boat and pulled for all we were worth. Each time we got near the water's edge, the tide would go out some more. My arms were burning, my legs felt like wet noodles, and still we kept pulling. Finally got the boat in enough water to float and powered out of the flats back to the channel. We were both too pooped to pop by this time, so gave up fishing and went back home. My arms and back hurt for days after. We still joke about it, but damned if I don't pay close attention to tide every time I beach a boat now.
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By Yakety-Yak
#2167972
Well not too long ago I took a trip out by my work on pelican Island to fish the slips in the channel by our company slip for some trout. I looked at the weather and everything and it all seemed to look ideal. So, I lowered the trolling motor and stabilizers (homemade lobster float kind) and headed out to a known area just passed all the slips that is good for flounder and trout year round. I stayed there for about 20-30 minutes and started the long trek along the beachhead staying as close to the shore as I can and made my way over by the big rigs that were docked to try them out. Well by that time I noticed the wind had started to kick up but it was at my back and I thought to myself "well this is quite nice! I got a nice breeze on a beautiful day and the wind at my back". Oh boy was I in for a nice surprise! I eventually made it over to the rigs and noticed I started to get REALLY sluggish on speed. I looked in the hull and the first thought in my head was (OH SH*T!!! I gotta beach this damn thing!) I had about 9 inches of water in my kayak and it has a depth of about 11. I could literally start fishing in my kayak instead at this point. So I look and look for a place where I can beach this thing and get as much water as I can out of this damn kayak. I finally I found a little strip of shell, rock, trees and trash so I beached it there. After I muscled this thousand pound kayak to shore I broke out my portable bilge pump and started pumping. 30 minutes later I found myself with an empty hull, empty cooler and a pissed off fisherman. I decided God doesn't want me to fish today so I decided to go back to my launch point (keep in mind I am now going upwind and the water has gotten A LOT choppier). Long story short I ended up pumping this damn thing 3 more times before I made it back to the slip with my last time where I had first fished on this trip. There was a guy fishing for flounder next to me in an aluminum boat and said "hey man you need help". Good Lord if that didn't piss me off more I don't know what else would. So I finally made it back to the slip, wet, pissed off and empty handed. Found out that I was "sinking" due to a combination of choppy water, bad winds and a piss poor construction for a stabilizer which threw loads of water in the kayak that had a piss poor engineered back hatch. Just glad I didn't "sink" to the bottom of the Galveston ship channel. This thing Ascend calls a kayak is now under serious construction and hopefully this trip wont be repeated or I might have to just stay with bank fishing haha.
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By Cityfisher
#2167973
My one and only "oh crap" moment was not to bad, but it did scare me when it happened. I had just paddled to shore where I was parked and on my way to the truck I kept noticing some fish activity. There were some flounder getting airborne chasing shrimp. So, of course I have to make a few casts. My paddle tail kept getting hung up on the little pot holes on the sandy bottom but I could jerk it loose pretty easy. Then one time that thing would not come up. I pulled with all my might and wham, that paddle tail with a 1/8 oz jig head came at me like a bullet and struck me right between my eyebrows. It didn't fall to the ground after it it hit me either. I stood there stunned for a moment and thought "errr, that didn't hurt to bad". Then a sinking feeling came over me that the barb may be stuck past the skin. I went to the truck, looked in the mirror and saw that my skull had kept that hook from going past the barb. I give it a good tug and with a little bit of effort it gave a little sound and pop, came on out with barely a mark to show for it. Whew! That could have been bad!
#2168021
Oh crap moment from 2 weeks ago....I was kayaking a bayou and came to some railroad tracks crossing the bayou. I have paddled under these tracks numerous times in the past but this time the tide was alot higher but still looked low enough for me to make it under. I lay back on my yak as i get close and slide the first half of the yak under the tressle, lay my head down sideways and the next thing i know my head his stuck/sandwiched between the yak and the tressle with a strong tide ripping through. Now i'm starting to freak out because i feel like i'm about to flip over from the current. I make myself calm down and relax, i push up with my hands on the bottom of the tressle and end up working my way out....barely. I felt like i ripped my ears off, they still hurt today, 2 weeks later. It could of been a really bad situation if i would of freaked out. I still haven't told the wife about this because she is always worried about me yakkin' alone.
By rasaid
#2168062
"Another Treble Hook Event", -Finally in the water after a 17 hour drive and another hour paddle. Thought I had a friend to fish with me for the next 4 days but he's bailed so I'm solo. First cast with my topwater hooked an ultra dink red. In the yak he pops off and the very old an very rusty treble hook springs into my index finger. I spend the next 45 minutes alternating between working it back out, and then forcing it all the way through my finger with my pliers.
My nausea faded as soon as I pushed the rusty hook out. I used some lenses cleaner to sort of sterilize the wound and promised myself that if I started running a fever I'd go straight to the ER. Fished the rest of the week without any issues! I hate treble hooks.
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By JimBeaux
#2168077
rasaid wrote:"Another Treble Hook Event", -Finally in the water after a 17 hour drive and another hour paddle. Thought I had a friend to fish with me for the next 4 days but he's bailed so I'm solo. First cast with my topwater hooked an ultra dink red. In the yak he pops off and the very old an very rusty treble hook springs into my index finger. I spend the next 45 minutes alternating between working it back out, and then forcing it all the way through my finger with my pliers.
My nausea faded as soon as I pushed the rusty hook out. I used some lenses cleaner to sort of sterilize the wound and promised myself that if I started running a fever I'd go straight to the ER. Fished the rest of the week without any issues! I hate treble hooks.


Very smart-fever is the first sign of a possible life threatening infection. There is stuff in our water that can overwhelm our resistance & kill us in hours.

I carry a small bottle of hand sanitizer & stay alert to cuts, jabs & abrasions. MRSAs only need a micro door

After Hurricane Ike my sailboat was beached and the contract salvagers removed my bilge hatches. When I boarded in the dark I stepped into the bilge and skinned my shin-not a lot of damage but it hurt like hell.

After fighting the insatiable itch for weeks (thought it was fiberglass splinters) I ended up in the emergency room during the Christmas holiday with 2-3 IVs going.

I had contracted a bad case of cellulitis, a staph infection.The docs said if I had waited much longer I could have risked amputation.

We all carry staph bacteria on our skin and sometimes in our noses, though our skin is a barrier, any skin break and we now have staph under the skin. So minor wounds on the water can result in a MRSA.

Hospital staff is paranoid when the subject comes to prevention. Be careful.
#2168093
I've had a couple of serious 'oh crap' moments and come close to drowning a few times. Those stories aren't funny at all and this one kinda is. Besides, I got a request to repost this oldy but goody.

Quite a few years ago I was at matagorda island state park(now MISWR) just east of bayside campground. There were 5 of us and two 2man yaks so I was odd man out first day. Brother and buddies went west toward Pringle and I waded east by myself. Fishing was mediocre but I had seen some reds way up in the grass. I waded in to look behind a small island (20'X10'). I took one step up onto said island and the water on the back side exploded. For a split second I thought I spooked a whole school of reds. Then I saw, and heard it - a 11-12 foot gator coming right at me. It had its mouth wide open and was grunting like a drunken tuba player. In the time it took me to take one step back and fall into the water it covered the 20 foot gap between us and was halfway on the island. My only thought of self defense was to use the butt end of my rod but I didnt even have time to spin it around. I was on my butt in knee deep water when it came over the island and launched itself into the water right at my side. After 10 tries I got to my feet, too scared to go onto the island(there might be another one I thought) and too scared to go further into the water. So I high stepped it down the bank for about 50 yards. I woulda gone farther but that was all I could do. I don't know if I've ever breathed so hard but my heart almost leapt from my chest. What a rush! I'm convinced that I only startled it and it was just going for deeper water. My buddies think it was coming after me but I fell under it's line of sight. Who knows, maybe it was and gators are just afraid of the bottoms of people's feet.

Yep, that might not have been my biggest 'oh crap' moment but it was my funniest. Too bad nobody was there to see it.
By Charlie23
#2168177
Flippin' Crazee wrote:Oh crap moment from 2 weeks ago....I was kayaking a bayou and came to some railroad tracks crossing the bayou. I have paddled under these tracks numerous times in the past but this time the tide was alot higher but still looked low enough for me to make it under. I lay back on my yak as i get close and slide the first half of the yak under the tressle, lay my head down sideways and the next thing i know my head his stuck/sandwiched between the yak and the tressle with a strong tide ripping through. Now i'm starting to freak out because i feel like i'm about to flip over from the current. I make myself calm down and relax, i push up with my hands on the bottom of the tressle and end up working my way out....barely. I felt like i ripped my ears off, they still hurt today, 2 weeks later. It could of been a really bad situation if i would of freaked out. I still haven't told the wife about this because she is always worried about me yakkin' alone.


i think i know which rr bridge you're talking about... i just let the kayak flow under the bridge while i cross the bridge over to the other side.

that area good for winter bites?
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By richg99
#2168207
Not a kayak story but....

Many years ago I bought a brand new 20 ft. Gulf Coast bay boat. I took it out on its maiden voyage to Greens Lake. Everything ran just fine and I don't remember if I found any fish or not.

When it came time to run the boat back up the Intercoastal Canal towards the causeway bridge, I got her up and was planing along, happy as a clam.

On the way into Green's Lake, I noticed a big barge grounded on the South side of the ICW.

Heading back to the East, I saw the tail end of the barge and tugboat combination still grounded on the starboard side of the canal. I thought I'd just swing round the stern and pass on the port side of the rig.

Just about that time, my low-water alarm started sounding off on the brand new engine. I was worried about burning up my new baby, so I shut her down and slid off to the shoreline on the South.

As I sat against the sand, I looked up at the opening next to the stalled barge. Powering through that opening was the front of another barge string, pushed by a big tug. There was NO space left between the two barges and the shorelines on either side.

Had my engine alarm not gone off, I would have shot around the blind corner, directly into the slanted bow of the second barge. I have no doubt that I would have driven my new boat, at high speed, right under the barge. The result had to be death.

It took me a long time to catch my breath. Eventually, another boat came along and towed me in.

The next day, I took the boat back to Red-Wing in Houston. They could not find anything whatsoever wrong with the engine. As to why the alarm went off....I'll never know.

richg99
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By Cityfisher
#2168210
richg99 wrote:Not a kayak story but....

Many years ago I bought a brand new 20 ft. Gulf Coast bay boat. I took it out on its maiden voyage to Greens Lake. Everything ran just fine and I don't remember if I found any fish or not.

When it came time to run the boat back up the Intercoastal Canal towards the causeway bridge, I got her up and was planing along, happy as a clam.

On the way into Green's Lake, I noticed a big barge grounded on the South side of the ICW.

Heading back to the East, I saw the tail end of the barge and tugboat combination still grounded on the starboard side of the canal. I thought I'd just swing round the stern and pass on the port side of the rig.

Just about that time, my low-water alarm started sounding off on the brand new engine. I was worried about burning up my new baby, so I shut her down and slid off to the shoreline on the South.

As I sat against the sand, I looked up at the opening next to the stalled barge. Powering through that opening was the front of another barge string, pushed by a big tug. There was NO space left between the two barges and the shorelines on either side.

Had my engine alarm not gone off, I would have shot around the blind corner, directly into the slanted bow of the second barge. I have no doubt that I would have driven my new boat, at high speed, right under the barge. The result had to be death.

It took me a long time to catch my breath. Eventually, another boat came along and towed me in.

The next day, I took the boat back to Red-Wing in Houston. They could not find anything whatsoever wrong with the engine. As to why the alarm went off....I'll never know.

richg99


That's a good story Rich. I have no doubt the good lord was looking out for you!
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By Cityfisher
#2168211
redneckyakclub01 wrote:I've had a couple of serious 'oh crap' moments and come close to drowning a few times. Those stories aren't funny at all and this one kinda is. Besides, I got a request to repost this oldy but goody.

Quite a few years ago I was at matagorda island state park(now MISWR) just east of bayside campground. There were 5 of us and two 2man yaks so I was odd man out first day. Brother and buddies went west toward Pringle and I waded east by myself. Fishing was mediocre but I had seen some reds way up in the grass. I waded in to look behind a small island (20'X10'). I took one step up onto said island and the water on the back side exploded. For a split second I thought I spooked a whole school of reds. Then I saw, and heard it - a 11-12 foot gator coming right at me. It had its mouth wide open and was grunting like a drunken tuba player. In the time it took me to take one step back and fall into the water it covered the 20 foot gap between us and was halfway on the island. My only thought of self defense was to use the butt end of my rod but I didnt even have time to spin it around. I was on my butt in knee deep water when it came over the island and launched itself into the water right at my side. After 10 tries I got to my feet, too scared to go onto the island(there might be another one I thought) and too scared to go further into the water. So I high stepped it down the bank for about 50 yards. I woulda gone farther but that was all I could do. I don't know if I've ever breathed so hard but my heart almost leapt from my chest. What a rush! I'm convinced that I only startled it and it was just going for deeper water. My buddies think it was coming after me but I fell under it's line of sight. Who knows, maybe it was and gators are just afraid of the bottoms of people's feet.

Yep, that might not have been my biggest 'oh crap' moment but it was my funniest. Too bad nobody was there to see it.


That's not an "Oh crap" moment, that's a "crap in your pants" moment!!

I have a very healthy respect for them gators. I was way up Cedar Creek off of Lake Sommerville alone one time when I paddled by what looked like an alligator slide coming from a nest down the bank. It was early spring and I've seen enough of animal planet shows to have a pretty good idea what they look like, and I tell you, I couldn't paddle fast enough out of that creek! And to top it off the carp were spawning everywhere making all kinds of loud splashes everywhere scaring me half to death.
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By MobyYack
#2197985
My third BTB I was meeting with a guy at GISP but we got there before 7 so decided on 61st street. My Lavika spray skirt failed on rentry in 3-5 ft waves and my paddle partner wasnt even paying attention. My yak flipped...lost a rod and some tackle. Then the yak starts to float UNDER THE FISHING PIER. As I scramble to swim towards it a see cobwebs of hooks lines floats EVERYTHING tangled under the pier. Im trying to swim underwater with a PFD to avoid hooks :lol: The lady on the pier yells "You need help?" Im thinking "Naw, Ill just stay down here swimming with these hooks lady". The current pulls me under the pier. When I emerge on the other side the lifeguard is halfway to me. Im tugging a 1000 lb yak to shore getting pounded waves and I yell to the lifeguard "Im cool bro!". Believe it or not I was shockingly calm during this whole situation and kinda had it under control other than the hook under the pier and my yak partner not paying attention at all. Fire truck came and left quickly so i guess someone called 911.

Never go BTB in 3-5 waves
Know your Yak partner, someone you just met on TKF is not necessarily going to watch your back
(I hope no one takes that the wrong way)
tie everything down
#2198000
Taking a hardhead off the hook as I'd done thousands of times before I gave a sort of death squeeze to this particular specimen as he was quite lively and I had been catching nothing but them for hours while fishing with my wife and father in law...(stories regarding him insisting upon staying out while its lightning would disturb you.) When I went to throw this vermin upon the shore near the boat he had one last kick in him that drove his pectoral fin about an inch into the skin between my thumb and index finger on my left hand. Immediately the pain was so intense that I just froze...I sat back down in my seat saying nothing...sulking as you will...behind me I hear my father in law say..."thought you were throwing him on the bank?" I turned to reveal the fish hanging from my tender flesh. He and my wife suddenly became experts on the matter and gave what seemed like 100 ways to resolve my issue. I calmly asked for the pliers that luckily had cutters on them. I skillfully placed the cutter upon the base of the fin closest to the fish and squeezed. The fish fell free. Problem 1 solved...now to remove the barbed death pulsating in my throbbing hand. I asked now for a rag to bite down on and was granted my request. As I bit down, I saw their faces turn white with squeamishness as they realized what I was about to do...I grabbed the fin with all the surface area I could and yanked with the might of 10 grown men. The blood gushed profusely as the fin was ripped from my flesh. I placed the rag in my teeth upon the wound and held down pressure to stop the bleeding. By this time my father in law had hurled over the side of the boat and my wife was still shaken. They began pulling the anchor as I said "No...I'm not done fishing yet..." I picked up my rod and continued fishing while the pain was exponentially increasing. Despite their pleading to quit and seek medical attention I fished on...Wound up with 2 slot reds and a flounder shortly after. Finally the father in law stated that he couldn't watch me suffer any longer as it was ruining his fishing and we pulled anchor and headed for the dock. Being the fat boy I am, I suggested that we eat at Bubba's in Seadrift on our way home. I'm thankful I did because it was Bubba himself that shared the best wisdom I've heard regarding hardhead or stingray wounds. Vicks VapoRub...he had some on hand and I applied it to the wound that by this time was nearing the level of pain of being kicked in the testicles repeatedly. To my surprise, the pain subsided almost immediately, the strength came back in my hand and I was able to move it pain free within an hour or so. I continued to put the vicks on it when I got home and was able to thoroughly clean the wound. The next day...like it had never happened...no swelling...no pain...just a small hole where the fin had once resided...


There are many other stories of "Oh Crap!" but lets just say I come by username honestly...so those are completely avoidable yet sometimes hair raising instances...
User avatar
By MobyYack
#2198006
GatorSnatcher wrote:Taking a hardhead off the hook as I'd done thousands of times before I gave a sort of death squeeze to this particular specimen as he was quite lively and I had been catching nothing but them for hours while fishing with my wife and father in law...(stories regarding him insisting upon staying out while its lightning would disturb you.) When I went to throw this vermin upon the shore near the boat he had one last kick in him that drove his pectoral fin about an inch into the skin between my thumb and index finger on my left hand. Immediately the pain was so intense that I just froze...I sat back down in my seat saying nothing...sulking as you will...behind me I hear my father in law say..."thought you were throwing him on the bank?" I turned to reveal the fish hanging from my tender flesh. He and my wife suddenly became experts on the matter and gave what seemed like 100 ways to resolve my issue. I calmly asked for the pliers that luckily had cutters on them. I skillfully placed the cutter upon the base of the fin closest to the fish and squeezed. The fish fell free. Problem 1 solved...now to remove the barbed death pulsating in my throbbing hand. I asked now for a rag to bite down on and was granted my request. As I bit down, I saw their faces turn white with squeamishness as they realized what I was about to do...I grabbed the fin with all the surface area I could and yanked with the might of 10 grown men. The blood gushed profusely as the fin was ripped from my flesh. I placed the rag in my teeth upon the wound and held down pressure to stop the bleeding. By this time my father in law had hurled over the side of the boat and my wife was still shaken. They began pulling the anchor as I said "No...I'm not done fishing yet..." I picked up my rod and continued fishing while the pain was exponentially increasing. Despite their pleading to quit and seek medical attention I fished on...Wound up with 2 slot reds and a flounder shortly after. Finally the father in law stated that he couldn't watch me suffer any longer as it was ruining his fishing and we pulled anchor and headed for the dock. Being the fat boy I am, I suggested that we eat at Bubba's in Seadrift on our way home. I'm thankful I did because it was Bubba himself that shared the best wisdom I've heard regarding hardhead or stingray wounds. Vicks VapoRub...he had some on hand and I applied it to the wound that by this time was nearing the level of pain of being kicked in the testicles repeatedly. To my surprise, the pain subsided almost immediately, the strength came back in my hand and I was able to move it pain free within an hour or so. I continued to put the vicks on it when I got home and was able to thoroughly clean the wound. The next day...like it had never happened...no swelling...no pain...just a small hole where the fin had once resided...


There are many other stories of "Oh Crap!" but lets just say I come by username honestly...so those are completely avoidable yet sometimes hair raising instances...

nice call on the vics vapor rub...that needs to be a thread of it own....my dad will love that info

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