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By MRSRIDE
#1649752
Excellent thread!! :) Made even better by the first accounts, creditials, and comments given in context including the arguements for the wrong side... now we all know a lot more than before we read this thread... read it all from the begining to the end with an open well intentioned mind... and then use common sense when applying your newly learned information. I'm in for the wilderness first aid class!
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By Cadiyak Sam
#1649781
H2O Seeker wrote:Wow...very surprised this is not it's own chapter as it is THAT important. I read back from the beginning and a ton of good info. I like your list Cadiyak Sam. Only thing I have not on your list is waterproof matches and a fire starter. Hope to never need it for emergecy/survival situation but if you don't have it you can't use it. Also, knife is on my person. Strapped to my vest or leg and very easily accessible.

Capt. Null wrote a decent little blurb in the May '11 issue of TSF Magazine page 52 about being prepeared on the water. More and more people are pushing the TTF product for sting ray hits. I don't have one yet but plan on getting one shortly to go in my 1st aid kit(s). I have a large kit in each vehicle and a well stocked waterproof kit readily accessible at all times on the water. Fish long enough and you will cut a hook out of yourself or a fishing partner before your days n the water are done.

Someone also mentioned not needing instruction. Instruction means different things to different people and Mother Nature can be a merciless instructor.

Good call on the fire starting equipment. I always have at least one lighter in my pocket, they're just always in there so I forgot to mention it. I have a pocket knife in my PFD but I want a better one with a hook for cutting straps or rope. Good stuff y'all, keep it coming.
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By Doug Poudre
#1652079
Just to play Devil's advocate. I know it's been a dry summer and the state is under a burn ban, but what would you start a fire with and where would you start it off shore? In the marsh?
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By Doug Poudre
#1654063
Cadiyak Sam wrote:I've got one of these: http://www.rei.com/product/738435/colem ... rner-stove . I can't quite fit it in my front hatch, but it does fit in my dry bag, which I can keep in the back. I think any butane-powered portable stove would be good to use. You can start those butane stoves in almost any weather conditions, as long as its not too wet.

That thing weights 7+lbs. :shock: No way I'm going to take that paddling every time I go out. If having something to make hot drinks to stay warm is important, take a look at thishttp://shop.jetboil.com/index.php/flash.html. I don't personally have one, but have numerous friends who use them solo back packing. They are relatively tiny by comparison
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By Cadiyak Sam
#1654483
Yeah, that thing's cool. I only take mine on multiple day trips because you can actually cook food on it. It's one of the smallest dual-burner butane stoves that I've seen around.
By Luke01
#1655574
Doug Poudre wrote:
Cadiyak Sam wrote:I've got one of these: http://www.rei.com/product/738435/colem ... rner-stove . I can't quite fit it in my front hatch, but it does fit in my dry bag, which I can keep in the back. I think any butane-powered portable stove would be good to use. You can start those butane stoves in almost any weather conditions, as long as its not too wet.

That thing weights 7+lbs. :shock: No way I'm going to take that paddling every time I go out. If having something to make hot drinks to stay warm is important, take a look at thishttp://shop.jetboil.com/index.php/flash.html. I don't personally have one, but have numerous friends who use them solo back packing. They are relatively tiny by comparison


I have two jet boils and love them. One I use for cooking food or heating up water and the second one is set up with a french press for my girl to have her coffee when we are hiking/camping. I think my favorite thing about them is that everthing packs into the cup so just one thing to toss in a pack or hull and not have to worry about it.

I currenlty have a dry bag packed for emergency use and I have a MSR pocket rocket in it with a single fuel canister packed inside a pinnacle soloist.
http://www.rei.com/product/660163/msr-p ... king-stove
http://www.rei.com/product/784114/gsi-o ... st-cookset

Reilable works everytime and cheap if case it gets lost or damaged
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By FlatsYakker
#1664393
This is so basic as to sound trite, but being new to kayak fishing I've been focusing on gear, rigging, lures/baits, and forgetting that the biggest variable in my first inshore saltwater kayak trip is ME! Seemingly in another lifetime I was a SCUBA instructor and taught CPR, but it's been much too long to be of real use should I capsize tomorrow, in high wind on a large body of water.

Of all the superb information I've gleaned over the past ten days on this site, this thread has been the most useful one to me, a newbie to kayak fishing.

Thanks, fellows, for your willingness to share your wisdom and experience.
By crash
#1665279
This is a truly great thread! I have kayaking for only a few months now and find this information very helpful. I have done quite a bit of primitive backpacking and find that a lot of the survival information carries over. I have a book where I have learned the majority of my wilderness survival, first aid, etc. and think many of you may find it beneficial as well.
http://www.amazon.com/Backpackers-Field ... 290&sr=1-1

It is the backpackers field manual and cover a plethora of information.

As far as safety knives attached to a pdf, what knives do you all carry?
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By FlatsYakker
#1665326
crash wrote:This is a truly great thread! I have kayaking for only a few months now and find this information very helpful. I have done quite a bit of primitive backpacking and find that a lot of the survival information carries over. I have a book where I have learned the majority of my wilderness survival, first aid, etc. and think many of you may find it beneficial as well.
http://www.amazon.com/Backpackers-Field ... 290&sr=1-1

It is the backpackers field manual and cover a plethora of information.

As far as safety knives attached to a pdf, what knives do you all carry?



I'd recommend the Zeagle Line Cutter; not technically a knife, but more useful with one hand when you're snagged. It's less than $20 at K2scuba..

http://www.k2scuba.com/product_descript ... roduct=962

Or you can get this other brand for $4 more, but it's the same thing...

http://www.k2scuba.com/product_descript ... roduct=496

You'll find it useful for many little chores, not just in the event you're turtled/snagged, whatever. When I was a SCUBA instructor, I always directed my students to carry a basic line cutter like this, in addition to a larger dive knife for digging, prying, and other such.

There are dive knives that have the line cutter on the top of the blade, like a gutting hook. I find that less useful than a plain Zeagle Cutter; it's fast and intuitive, and pulls out in a split second when you need it, even with gloves on.
By txndfan82
#1686935
Just knowing and acknowledging ones physical abilities can save your life and keep you out of dangerous situations, you may say "there is nothing I can do about that" but you can, you can exercise and do other activities to put you in a better physical condition. I had a situation this summer wade fishing at Skeeter Island in TC where I went to the assistance of a man in distress in water over my head and after getting to him floating on my do net and realizing that I was burning precious energy trying to get him to shallower water, I was able to signal a powerboat to come in and scoop us up.

I was wearing a PFD and the situation could have been alot worse had I not had it on properly nor had I had my do net with me.

Situational Awareness can be the difference in staying safe or getting into hairy situations where the outcomes can be very negative.
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By Glockamole
#1689140
I generally fish alone about 80% of the time, primarily 4-5 hour trips within very specific areas I focus on....but that may not be the case in the future. I also focus on safety, all the gear, weather, etc.... A couple of recent experiences, one that ended up with surgery and a long rehab will change my future approach.

First case was fishing McNab in summer of 2010 alone and back in about 3/4 of a mile. Noticed something dark floating about 4 ft. from my yak. Initially thought it was a piece of wood...but looking closer realized it was a gator head. Gator splashed and I saw a 7-8 foot body. Saw about 8 more and one which was really BIG. Would be concerned landing a fish while the gator wanted it at the same time. That type of injury, that far back in the marsh could be very bad.

Went back to McNab on Good Friday with my son which turned out to be a not so good friday. I slipped in the mud while preparing to enter my yak and felt a pop and strain in my hip joint. As I started to get up I almost blacked out and broke into a cold sweat. Recovered after about five minutes, could move around OK so we fished for about 3-4 hours. Pain not too bad. Upon existing, a repeat of the syptoms again, nearly passing out. Could place no weight on the leg. Son loaded everything up and we headed in. Key point is that the hip had been replaced 17 years ago when I was in my 30's.

Xrays showed no damage so I was treated for a severe strain. A week later I'm at the orthopedic with no improvement and things rattling around in the joint. End up with a hairline fracture of the pelvis (not requiring surgery) but did need a couple of the parts replaced. Rather than recover twice I elected for surgery about 10 days later. Off work for about 10 weeks and off crutches and a cane since late-July.

Could have been more careful with the entry. Thinking about a stake out stick to use as an extra assist during entry/exit. Fishing with a partner is probably a good plan for the future. If that type of accident had happened a mile in and alone it could prove very bad.

Mike
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By quincyraybon
#1690170
I gotta be honest, I read the first page and a half then just skipped through.. but I never thought of the safety aspect of things at all.

My two brothers have kayaks.. I take one of them (which ever is closer) out fishing. Either the SIK or the SOT. I never take a life jacket.. I have absolutely no safety gear... most of the time just a fishing pole and some bait! I don't go out in to large open waters very often though... 99% I will be by myself kayak fishing. Partly because I don't know anyone that kayak fishes.

This all made a huge impact! I'm looking to buy a kayak as soon as I get the money, but would never have thought about all of the things brought up in this thread. Thanks guys!

-Q
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By billy bobba
#1693486
Here is a story of a recent tragedy which indicates how things can go bad in a hurry when out on the water.
I paddle surf skis off shore sometimes, and have had my boat leash snap from waves --- it can be scary.
These light boats can get away from you quickly in even moderate winds.
I think the lesson learned from this tragedy is that seemingly small decisions can have huge -- perhaps deadly -- consequences.
In this case I feel the fatal error was having the cell phone located on the kayak, rather than in his PFD.
I carry my cell phone and signal flares in a water proof bag in a pocket on my PFD.
The support boat should have had a cell phone as well.

http://www.skinnyski.com/notices/display.asp?Id=23697

http://www.twincities.com/ci_19090968
By Texas Wader
#1709313
i believe with Justin Wilson's philosophy "I am a safety man. I wear a belt and suspenders."
not being prepared is just senseless.

in almost 8 years of paddeling through all types of water on the Lugana Madre -washboards (3 and 4 foot waves coming at me from all sides), 30 mph plus winds and drunken power boaters i have turtled only 1 time and that was due to my stupidness. I had my first ever big snook on and reached across my body to net him, instead of switching hands with rod and net. just as i had him to the net he did a strong dive and over i went.
did i mention this was in 25 - 30 mph winds? when i surfaced i saw my yak about 50 yards away already. it was 30 minutes before sunset and i was in south bay with no one in sight. oh yeah - snook was still on. turned on my back and kicked to where i could stand up. fish still on. nice 28 snook.
after my elation over snook i realized sun was setting, I am stranded, keys to truck in dry bag on yak, cell phone in dry bag and i had not purchased a vhf radio.

just as i was about to give up around the point comes a guy wanting to get in a few more casts. he saw my yak and retrieved it. then came over and took pics of me and the snook. he related how he was stranded once in powerboat on a sand bar and tide was going out. he also had good luck of someone coming along right at sunset.

point is - no matter how good you think you are - anything that can happen usually will happen. i never take off my pfd, even when i anchor and wade. i like the pockets on the pfd. i also never go without the radio. even when i wade right next to CGS.
ron
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By Doug Poudre
#1721760
Originally posted by Pogo.http://www.texaskayakfisherman.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=149090

From one of my email lists.....

"Are you alright?" is a question to ask anytime you see someone who has stopped an activity. For instance, while kayaking/canoeing ask "Are you alright?" anytime you see a fellow paddler on the shoreline. 99% of the time they are just taking a break. the other 1% could be dehydrated and getting delusonal or approaching collapse. (especially applies to racing)

On the water, the playing field, bike or hike trail, mall walker, car on the side of the road etc etc. Asking "Are you alright?" could save a strangers life.

Drowning Doesn't Look Like Drowning
by MARIO on MAY 18, 2010
BOATING SAFETY,COAST GUARD,GCAPTAIN
The new captain jumped from the cockpit, fully dressed, and sprinted through the water. A former lifeguard, he kept his eyes on his victim as he headed straight for the owners who were swimming between their anchored sportfisher and the beach. "I think he thinks you're drowning," the husband said to his wife. They had been splashing each other and she had screamed but now they were just standing, neck-deep on the sand bar. "We're fine, what is he doing?" she asked, a little annoyed. "We're fine!" the husband yelled, waving him off, but his captain kept swimming hard. "Move!" he barked as he sprinted between the stunned owners. Directly behind them, not ten feet away, their nine-year-old daughter was drowning. Safely above the surface in the arms of the captain, she burst into tears, "Daddy!"

How did this captain know, from fifty feet away, what the father couldn't recognize from just ten? Drowning is not the violent, splashing, call for help that most people expect. The captain was trained to recognize drowning by experts and years of experience. The father, on the other hand, had learned what drowning looks like by watching television. If you spend time on or near the water (hint: that's all of us) then you should make sure that you and your crew knows what to look for whenever people enter the water. Until she cried a tearful, "Daddy," she hadn't made a sound. As a former Coast Guard rescue swimmer, I wasn't surprised at all by this story. Drowning is almost always a deceptively quiet event. The waving, splashing, and yelling that dramatic conditioning (television) prepares us to look for, is rarely seen in real life.

The Instinctive Drowning Response – so named by Francesco A. Pia, Ph.D., is what people do to avoid actual or perceived suffocation in the water. And it does not look like most people expect. There is very little splashing, no waving, and no yelling or calls for help of any kind. To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic from the surface drowning can be, consider this: It is the number two cause of accidental death in children, age 15 and under (just behind vehicle accidents) – of the approximately 750 children who will drown next year, about 375 of them will do so within 25 yards of a parent or other adult. In ten percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch them do it, having no idea it is happening (source: CDC). Drowning does not look like drowning – Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard's On Scene Magazine, described the instinctive drowning response like this:

Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled, before speech occurs.

Drowning people's mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people's mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.

Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water's surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water, permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.

Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.

From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people's bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.

This doesn't mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn't in real trouble – they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the instinctive drowning response, aquatic distress doesn't last long – but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc.

Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are n the water:
Head low in the water, mouth at water level
Head tilted back with mouth open
Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus
Eyes closed
Hair over forehead or eyes
Not using legs – Vertical
Hyperventilating or gasping
Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway
Trying to roll over on the back
Ladder climb, rarely out of the water.

So if a crew member falls overboard and every looks O.K. – don't be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don't look like they're drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them: "Are you alright?" If they can answer at all – they probably are. If they return a blank stare – you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents: children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.
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By billy bobba
#1741049
Story of a recent power boat accident (3-24-12) ---

http://www.kiiitv.com/story/17246560/bo ... erson-dead

The incident report is short on details at this time but a good point is made by the Coast Guard about leaving a plan with someone in case you do not return in the expected time period. It makes the search process much easier.
I leave my fishing / paddling destination and plan as a text message on my wife's phone, but I am sometimes guilty of not updating this info when I change my plans.
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By capt carl
#1752708
I am un safe fisherman by most standards,as i fish at night and alone most of the time .No one knows where i will be fishing as i move around a lot.I feel safe becaust i have fish and hunted ducks most of my life and yes i duck hunt alone.Here are the tips that i live with,always wear pfd make sure that the kayak you use is safe ,I have a hobie,after almost filping a ok drifter that did not carry my weight well.I fish winter a lot and always wear waders,but if you wear waders it is most important that you wear a belt on your chest when wading or fishing without this belt to trap air you will find yourself in over your head with your waders full of water,making it impossible to swim or get out of the water.I have learned this lesson the hard way.With a belt your waders will be full of air and be a added flotation device.
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By dansracing
#1771548
Being new myself and reading this entire thread has certainly opened my eyes. Your efforts of encouraging safety has worked for me. I feel like I am pretty careful but this thread has taught me a few things and ways to prepare that I will certainly use. I hope I never have to post a report on a rescue as I would hate to be in that situation.

My first outing is next weekend in a very shallow coastal lake that generally has many people around (popular spot) Oyster Lake. Going to break in the new Cuda and I hope my only report will be a good fishing one!

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